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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1231
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    I am currently reading 2 books:

    Magical Mystery Tours by Tony Bramwell

    This is the umpteenth (or is it the gazillionth?) book Iíve read about the Beatles. This is a memoir by someone who grew up with them and later went to work for Brian Epstein. There is no new information, just a lot of anecdotes. Barrow does a good job of personalizing the Beatles.

    This is in hardcover so itís kind of pain to carry around. So the book I travel with is:

    Byzantium Ė The Early Centuries by John Julius Norwich

    This is volume 1 of a 3 volume history of the Byzantium Empire. Volume 1 covers the period from the founding of the city of Constantinople in 330 (although the city of Byzantine was already there) through the crowing of Charlemagne in 800. I donít know if the latter date has any significance to the Byzantine Empire other than a conveniently memorable date in world history.

    This is a period in history that was never covered in any of my history classes and I have not been able to find much on until now. The book is very readable, so I am looking forward to reading all three volumes.

  2. #1232
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phat32
    What do you think of Robert Harris (Fatherland, Archangel)? I loved Fatherland, but I haven't picked up his new one, Pompeii, yet.
    I haven't tried Robert Harris yet phat32. I tend to read historical fiction that is less contemporary - not that WWII is contemporary, but it's moreso than 1480's Italy! Or 17th century France, which is when the book I'm reading now takes place. I did check out a few of his books on Amazon and they did look interesting. Just more titles to add to my shopping list!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  3. #1233
    CCL
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    Climbing Solsbury Hill CCL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phat32
    What do you think of Robert Harris (Fatherland, Archangel)? I loved Fatherland, but I haven't picked up his new one, Pompeii, yet.
    I read Enigma by Harris and quite liked it. I was going to read Fatherland but the mere idea that Hitler was successful in WWII freaked me out too much.

    Just finished reading Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Apparently I was mistakenly allowed to enter my 20s without having read it. It was quite entertaining.
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  4. #1234
    FORT Fogey joeguy's Avatar
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    "Hammerhead Ranch Motel" by Tom Dorsey

  5. #1235
    Swinging in the hammock Ilikai's Avatar
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    Just finished "Maximum Bob" by Elmore Leonard.... CBS had it as a tv show for about a minute 6-7 years ago, I liked it so they cancelled it after 6 shows. Bastards!!
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!" -- Steve Parker

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  6. #1236
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Just started reading Trace, Patricia Cornwell's latest Scarpetta novel. As a (former) massive Scarpetta fan, I usually jump at the very first hardback edition but with Blow Fly being such a let down, I waited for the paperback edition for this one. So far, so good. I still don't see why Cornwell thought it necessary to change perspective from the first person to the third, cause it doesn't really add anything to the plot. Still, I like it better than the previous one, so I'm hoping Cornwell isn't quite outnumbered yet.

    As for what's next in line for me, I bought The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon yesterday. I've heard marvellous things about it and can't wait to start reading it. Anyone here read it yet? It's pretty much been hyped to death by everyone from Stephen King to the literary critics.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  7. #1237
    Thinking femme fatale's Avatar
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    Reading The Da Vinchi Code, very exciting can't put it down, always falling asleep on top of it...

  8. #1238
    J/J for the win! DJeterFan's Avatar
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    I'm reading Towelhead, by Alicia Erian. Great book, too bad I'm almost done.

  9. #1239
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Critical
    I tend to read historical fiction that is less contemporary - not that WWII is contemporary, but it's moreso than 1480's Italy! Or 17th century France, which is when the book I'm reading now takes place.
    Critical, we may already have had this conversation, but have you read The Pillars of the Earth? My gut tells me you'd enjoy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by CCL
    I read Enigma by Harris and quite liked it. I was going to read Fatherland but the mere idea that Hitler was successful in WWII freaked me out too much.
    I know, CCL. If you think that's bad, you should have seen the map of the world as envisioned by Robert Harris if Hitler had been successful. +
    Last edited by phat32; 05-02-2005 at 10:33 PM.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  10. #1240
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phat32
    Critical, we may already have had this conversation, but have you read The Pillars of the Earth? My gut tells me you'd enjoy it.
    I thought I had a copy of it around here somewhere phat32 (you'd have to see how many books there are to understand why I'm not sure!), but I can't find it. My parents both read it and recommended it to me. Maybe I'll read their copy the next time I make a visit home. I love Sharon Kay Penman's Plantagenet series and Edward Rutherford's historical fiction, so I'm sure I'd love Pillars of the Earth as well.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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