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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1211
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    The Last King by Michael Curtis Ford

    This is currently my favourite type of book - a well researched historical novel based on real people. It's about Mithradates, of whom I suspect most people have not heard. He was the King of a small eastern country - Pontus - who dreamed of creating a Greek cultured power to counter balance the Roman Republic (Rome was not yet an empire). He failed, of course, or more people would know of him today.

    The book is well researched and the subject is interesting. I don't really like the way Ford writes - too many flashbacks and jumps in time. Ford does make Mithradates rather too heroic to seem a real person. But for once a book about this period is not written from the point of view of Rome. So overall I am enjoying it.

  2. #1212
    clap clap clap sleepysluggo's Avatar
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    I bought "The Dim Sum Of All Things" by Kim Wong Keltner. If you've ever wondered what the life of a native San Franciscian is really like, this is the book for you.

  3. #1213
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    Today I read Gene Wilder's Kiss Me Like a Stranger. Not really an autobiography or a memoir - more like a series of remembrances about key moments in his life. Mostly chronological, but not completely. The book sort of presupposes prior knowledge of Gene Wilder and his career, which I did have. It wasn't really one of those kiss-and-tell type things, but he was very open about himself and his problems, relationships, career.

    I just got a pile of books from joining QPB, so I'm not sure which one I'm going to read next. So many choices.....
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  4. #1214
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    Quote Originally Posted by ixcrisxi
    Hey all!

    Tell me what you're reading! I'm just curious. Maybe I'll pick up a few good books in time.



    I'm reading *deep breath*:
    The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring - J.R.R. Tolkien
    Blue Heron - Avi
    Gone-Away Lake - Elizabeth Enright
    Anne of Green Gables - Montgomery
    Charming Billy - Alice McDermott
    To My Daughter With Love - Susan Polis Schutz
    hugs for Friends
    The Best Loved Poems of the American People
    One Hundred and One Famous Poems
    A Separate Peace - John Knowles
    My Antonia - Willa Cather
    Streams of Silver - R.A. Salvatore
    Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
    The Scarlet Letter - Nathanial Hawthorne
    Lord Brocktree - Brian Jacques

    I know... I have way too much free time to do nothing and read. Guess that's what I get for living in a town without year-round schooling.
    I've come full-circle and am now fascinated by the lives of the Brontes, the parsonage, Haworth, and the age in general.....This, after years of reading Ann Rule. Meanwhile, I subscribe to 19 magazines. I find it curious that magazines are so often "dismissed" as toss-away tripe. Some of the greatest information and stories come from magazines. Yet, you don't see a "magazine forum" on any line.
    Last edited by leigh; 04-21-2005 at 11:19 PM.

  5. #1215
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    [QUOTE=vondl0][QUOTE=Harvest]I just saw a commercial announcing a star-studded production of this on HBO next month.

    I also saw the movie Mystic River. What do you all think of spending time reading books that you have already seen on TV (vs. reading new stories)?
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvest


    Normally I would read a book before seeing the movie but there have been a few cases that I do the reverse. I can say without exception I always prefer the book.

    I read Mystic River and saw the movie almost immediatly thereafter and while I wasn't exactly disappointed, I kept making inevitable comparisons. It's the same with countless others......The Horse Whisperer, White Oleander, The Pilot's Wife, The Weight of Water, yada yada yada.

    As far as seeing the movie prior to the book............well it all depends. I had House of Sand and Fog on my shelf for months, finally saw the movie and decided that if I do read the book, it will be later simply because I have other "new reads" I'd like to experience first. I just recently read A Time to Kill but did see that movie, albeit it was several years ago, and the details of the movie had become foggy.

    That being said, if Empire Falls is released as a motion picture, I'm sure I will see it. Same with DaVinci Code. I just have to let go of the concept of the inner dialogue I love so much with the books and enjoy the movies for what they are!
    In some cases, as in the Canadian movie, "Scandal," the movie does out-do the book.

  6. #1216
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    Quote Originally Posted by Critical
    Today I read Gene Wilder's Kiss Me Like a Stranger. Not really an autobiography or a memoir - more like a series of remembrances about key moments in his life. Mostly chronological, but not completely. The book sort of presupposes prior knowledge of Gene Wilder and his career, which I did have. It wasn't really one of those kiss-and-tell type things, but he was very open about himself and his problems, relationships, career.

    I just got a pile of books from joining QPB, so I'm not sure which one I'm going to read next. So many choices.....
    I'm curious to know about his relationship with Gilda, so I might have to read the book. Meanwhile, the first time I ever saw Gene Wilder was when he was leaning upside down from the top bunk in a jail talking to the sheriff, Cleavon Little, in "Blazing Saddles." Fell in love instantly.

  7. #1217
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    I'm about one-third of the way through Therapy, which is Johnathan Kellerman's latest Alex Delaware novel in paperback. I've been reading this series for over 10 years so it's a relaxing, comfortable read.

    Here is the list I'm choosing from next (all came from QPB along with Gene Wilder's book):
    • Brick Lane - Monica Ali
    • The Lady and the Unicorn - Tracy Chevalier
    • Holy Fools - Joanne Harris
    • L'Affaire - Diane Johnson
    • Birds Without Wings - Louis de Bernieres
    • A Venetian Affair - Andrea di Roubilant
    • Courtesans - Katie Hickman
    I don't know how I'm going to decide, although I am leaning towards Birds Without Wings because I loved Corelli's Mandolin so much (talk about a good book being made into a cr@ppy movie!).

    leigh: If you really want some insight into the relationship between Gilda Radner and Gene Wilder, I'd recommend Gilda's autobiography, It's Always Something. It's heartbreaking (beacuse you know what happened), but very good.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  8. #1218
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    Critical, I'm reading Therapy as well. I ran out of books, and my Amazon shipment didn't come yet, and so I had to pick it up for my latest plane ride. It's pretty decent. I think this is the first Kellerman book I've ever read.

  9. #1219
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    "The Great Mortality" by John Kelly. It's a book on the Black Death, which is my term paper topic. Normally, books like these would be boring, but not this one. It's an awesome book in itself.
    Gustav Holst was right!

  10. #1220
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    Quote Originally Posted by John
    Critical, I'm reading Therapy as well. I ran out of books, and my Amazon shipment didn't come yet, and so I had to pick it up for my latest plane ride. It's pretty decent. I think this is the first Kellerman book I've ever read.
    I just finished it last night John. Pretty good. I've read almost all of the Delaware series (I think I missed a few in the last year or two) and my favorite is still probably Bad Love because it scared the bejeezus out of me AND I had no idea "who dunnit"

    His wife, Faye Kellerman, writes a great series. The main characters are a police detective who discovered his Jewish faith as an adult, and his wife, who grew up orthodox (which they both practice). So, not only does Decker (the detective) have to deal with solving crime, he has to reconcile his job with his faith. The books are a nice mix of the usual crime/mystery and family life.

    Last night, I started The Lady and the Unicorn by Tracy Chevalier - she wrote Girl with a Pearl Earring and The Virgin Blue, both of which I loved, so I have high hopes for this one.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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