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Thread: English Corner

  1. #1
    Princess
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    English Corner

    Since we have some ppl around here with good command of the English language, I thought it would be neat to have a thread for those of us who have some questions regarding those "things" . Hopefully you who know better will be willing to help out?

    I have a couple of questions right now:
    1) Is it "as well" or "aswell"?
    2) Is it "a lot" or "alot"
    3) Is it "the pidgeons are affected by the noise in the park" or "the pidgeons are effected by the noise in the park"? (I'm pretty sure it's the former, but I've seen the latter so many times lately that I'm starting to feel uncertain...)
    4) What's the difference between a pidgeon and a dove?

    Thank you.

    (I thought this book forum might be a good place for this thread, pls move if you disagree.)

  2. #2
    Sexy evil genius Paulie's Avatar
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    1) "as well"
    2) "a lot" (although I've been told it's not good form to use that term, anyway)
    3) affected - it's a verb that means having an effect on something.
    4) A pigeon's one of those dirty city birds. A dove is a white bird of peace. I don't know how else to describe their difference.

    BTW, no "d" in "pigeon".

    The "Books" forum seems like a good place for this kind of discussion.
    When you're ten years old and a car drives by and splashes a puddle of water all over you, it's hard to decide if you should go to school like that or try to go home and change and probably be late. So while he was trying to decide, I drove by and splashed him again. - Jack Handey

    Read Paulie's Precaps for Survivor:Vanuatu: 1-2-3-4-5

  3. #3
    The Truth Is Out There ixcrisxi's Avatar
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    Here are some things I've picked up on the FORT:

    1. Definately is spelled definitely.
    2. Prolly doesn't exist. It is Probably.
    3. You can only get away with mispellings in the My Art thread. Artistic liberties and all that...
    MULDER: It's still there, Scully. 200,000 years down in the ice.

    SCULLY:
    Leave it there.

  4. #4
    Princess
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    Thanks Paulie! (Isn't "affected" an adjective though? I.e. you are affected because something had an effect on you? Oh, and I know that you can be affected - as in phony - too .)

    BTW, no "d" in "pigeon".
    I can't see that I asked you how to spell pigeon!!

  5. #5
    Sloth love Chunk! freisss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Modesty
    Isn't "affected" an adjective though?
    It's both an adjective and a past tense verb. It depends on how it's used:

    That movie affected me greatly. (verb)
    She continues to speak in that affected British accent. (adjective)

  6. #6
    Sexy evil genius Paulie's Avatar
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    And there's no charge for the "pigeon" lesson. It was my pleasure.
    When you're ten years old and a car drives by and splashes a puddle of water all over you, it's hard to decide if you should go to school like that or try to go home and change and probably be late. So while he was trying to decide, I drove by and splashed him again. - Jack Handey

    Read Paulie's Precaps for Survivor:Vanuatu: 1-2-3-4-5

  7. #7
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
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    So, I actually have some questions. There are a few words that I avoid using, because I never managed to keep the rules straight. Lie and lay. Someone spell this out for me. I need a good mnemonic device or something, as the standard lesson doesn't seem to get retained.

    Also - ending a sentence with a preposition: yes or no? I remember being taught that it's a strict no-no, but I also remember reading that this is an antiquated rule, and it was only applicable to Latin-based languages (as opposed to Germanic-based English). Even if it isn't a *rule*, per se, is it necessary to follow it, simply so that your readers don't think you're an idiot?

  8. #8
    Sloth love Chunk! freisss's Avatar
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    Lie: the subject of the sentence puts itself into a prone position (there is no direct object):
    "I think I'll lie down."
    "The cat was lying on the television set."

    Lay: An object is put down someplace. This object is the direct object of the sentence.
    "Lay your cards on the table."
    "Millie laid the book on her desk."

    As far as the preposition question is concerned, I always explain to my students (seventh graders) that there is a formal way of writing and an informal way. If you were writing your doctoral thesis, you'd want to avoid ending a sentence with a preposition, just in case there were really anal-retentive people evaluating it. Personally, I'll only call a student on it if it makes the sentence awkward or affects the flow of the writing.

  9. #9
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
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    Thanks, freiss! Now I just have to beat my head with a shoe in order to make that lesson stick. I don't know what it is about those words that I just can't keep straight.

    Hell, I couldn't even keep "who" and "whom" straight until I was 25.

    One of my biggest pet peeves is when people say "Join my husband and I for dinner". Okay, I understand that you think that's more formal-sounding. Great. But it's WRONG, you silly idiot. WRONG WRONG WRONG.

    I have issues.

  10. #10
    Sloth love Chunk! freisss's Avatar
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    LOL! Those people need to remember that when in doubt, take the other person out of the sentence. Which verb would you use? Then add that other person in.

    I have issues as well. ::sigh::

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