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Thread: English Corner

  1. #41
    Premium Member sheela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John
    Youse guys are making me feel so badly about my wife and I's use of the English language, I think I'm going to effect a quizzical look and lay down for a while. I should feel alot better after that.
    John, this totally cracked me up.

  2. #42
    Premium Member sheela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrammarGoddess
    Hey, there's another pet peeve...pronunciation spelled "pronounciation" and mischievous spelled "mischievious".
    It makes me grit my teeth when someone mispronounces the word. As in "The correct pronounciation is ..." or "Your pronounciation is wrong."
    Last edited by sheela; 10-04-2003 at 01:04 PM.

  3. #43
    RESIDENT JEDI MASTER Stargazer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Modesty
    GG... I think JJR T is correct as he was a linguist of sorts
    Sorry, I'm a bit of a Tolkien geek, so I wanted to jump in here.

    *J.R.R. Tolkien received a degree (I believe they are called Firsts or something
    in England) in English Language and Literature from Oxford.
    *He worked as a writer for "The New English Dictionary".
    *Became Reader in English Language (equivalent of a professor?) at
    Leeds University.
    *Served on varies other academic posts
    *Elected as Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford.

    So, unlike most authors, you can probably trust his judgment.

    Liguistics was an intensive hobby of his and he wrote the Hobbit as well as the Lord of the Rings to showcase the languages that he had created.
    "Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter."- Yoda

    "I'll just see where Providence takes me and try to look like I got there confidently." - Craig Ferguson

  4. #44
    Reformed Perfectionist G.G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stargazer401
    Sorry, I'm a bit of a Tolkien geek, so I wanted to jump in here.

    *J.R.R. Tolkien received a degree (I believe they are called Firsts or something
    in England) in English Language and Literature from Oxford.
    *He worked as a writer for "The New English Dictionary".
    *Became Reader in English Language (equivalent of a professor?) at
    Leeds University.
    *Served on varies other academic posts
    *Elected as Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford.

    So, unlike most authors, you can probably trust his judgment.

    Liguistics was an intensive hobby of his and he wrote the Hobbit as well as the Lord of the Rings to showcase the languages that he had created.
    Yikes - I wasn't necessarily bashing JRR. Mea culpa...and back to my corner?

  5. #45
    Princess
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    Thanks John!!

  6. #46
    Ready? haejin's Avatar
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    I'm so glad I found this thread. I should feel right at home reading this.

    As you might be able to infer, I am a major freak about correct grammar.

  7. #47
    RESIDENT JEDI MASTER Stargazer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrammarGoddess
    Yikes - I wasn't necessarily bashing JRR. Mea culpa...and back to my corner?
    Oh no! I'm sorry if you took it as chiding . I completely agree with what you said. Some of the worst grammatical mistakes that I've seen have been in books by well respected authors. Modesty just seemed to be unsure of what Tolkiens credentials were, so I was supplying them. I apologize if you thought I was taking up a gauntlet in his defense.
    "Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter."- Yoda

    "I'll just see where Providence takes me and try to look like I got there confidently." - Craig Ferguson

  8. #48
    Princess
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    Thanks stargazer - I actually knew that though, just too lazy to elaborate . (And I hadn't noticed that there was yet another page when I posted )

  9. #49
    Courtesy and Goodwill Mantenna's Avatar
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    Dogbert once said: "English would be a lot less confusing if we had smarter intellectuals!"

    I think that's the case with the "AWF-in" vs. "AWF-tin" argument. Over the years, many venerated experts in linguistics, among them John Walker, H. W. Fowler, and Alfred H. Holt, have consented that often was correctly pronounced with a silent "t."

    "The t in glisten is silent, even as it is in castle and often," proclaimed Frank H. Viztelly, editor of Funk & Wagnalls New Standard, "yet one occasionally hears pedants and provincials pronounce them [GLIS-ten] and [AWF-tin]. No pronouncing dictionary with a reputation to lose ever sounds the t in these words."

    Fair enough, right? The controversy exists in the popular misuse of "AWF-tin" by such a large number that it may now be considered acceptable. The U.S. lingual field also contains many dialects, which continues to confuse the matter. However, the fact remains that traditionally, or at least since the 17th century, the common pronunciation is "often" with a silent "t." "AWF-tin" is a fairly eccentric deviation that, while it may now be considered acceptable by some sources, does little but to further confuse the already-strange English language, and is disapproved of by cultivated speakers. Henry Cecil Wyld, an English lexicographer, called "AWF-tin" "vulgar and sham-refined."

    Regarding soften, listen, fasten, moisten, etc., etc., the "t" is simply not pronounced in those words, even as a secondary pronunciation. That would just be an incorrect pronunciation. Further examples include: hasten, chasten, christen, and Christmas.

    Ok, I'm done with my research project for the night!! That's just my side of the argument. My mum has lots of books on language, grammar, and pronunciation usage; she reads them for pleasure! Be glad she isn't a FORT member and hasn't found this thread....

  10. #50
    FORT Fogey nausicaa's Avatar
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    Wow. So much emphasis on grammar/syntax/proNUNciation, yet the greatest writer (arguably) of the English language is James Joyce...

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