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Thread: English Corner

  1. #31
    Smiling again... Zhora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkieparrot
    Because I've heard a few people say it "Nuke-u-ler" okay maybe Homer Simpson was one of them Ugh.
    Yeah, Homer Simpson and George Bush. I cringe every time I hear it.

  2. #32
    Courtesy and Goodwill Mantenna's Avatar
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    Often is pronounced off-en!! That's one of my biggest pet peeves. Lots of people argue that it's "off-ten," but that is the secondary pronunciation and less preferred. (That itself is probably a recent development because so many people have misused it.)

    No one pronounces the "t" in soften, listen, fasten, moisten, etc., etc.

    Also, nuclear is pronounced "N(Y)OO-klee-ur," not NOO-kyuh-lur. If you think about the root word, it's just silly to pronounce it like that.
    Last edited by Mantenna; 10-03-2003 at 10:09 PM.

  3. #33
    Courtesy and Goodwill Mantenna's Avatar
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    As for the "A"s, I believe it just has to do with different manuscript styles. The "robot teacher" "a" comes from the anglo-version alphabet style, and the cursive "a" that everyone uses comes from the arabic-rooted form.

  4. #34
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    You youngin's. I think the "a" comes from the old days when that's what the typeface on typewriters, newspapers, books, etc. looked like. See font type Courier. Each character took up the same amount of space. I don't think anyone started handwriting it that way until Mary Engelbreit came along.

    Mind you I'm just talking out my hinder here.
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  5. #35
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    This is the longhand a (or came with the invention of longhand). This "a" is the printed one. I'm guessing that this "a" is the older one.

    Re. pronounciation: I learnt somewhere that British English has a standard pronounciation (Queen's English) which is the "correct one", and that in American English all pronounciations are equally correct (well, within some limits, I assume).
    Eg. in British English, the correct pronounciation of "new" is "NYO", but in American English it can be pronounced "NOO" or "NYO" and both are equally correct. (And in American English I believe it's perfectly and equally correct to pronounce the "t" in soften, listen, fasten, moisten, etc., etc.)
    Re. names of places, it's usually (or always?) the local pronounciation that is regarded as the correct one.

    Thanks for the explanation of "as per", GG! Though - wouldn't it be "pur" if it really is short for "pursuant"? (I always thought that the "per" was the French per?)

    I have a new question:
    What is the difference between "as long as", and "so long as". I am quite sure they are both correct as they are both used by JRR Tolkien in his books , and I trust him to know his English, but I don't know what the difference is.
    Last edited by Modesty; 10-04-2003 at 08:08 AM.

  6. #36
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mantenna
    Often is pronounced off-en!!
    I almost always say ofT-en. I never really gave it any thought, though, until reading this. I guess by now it's so embedded in my mind that to say it differently would feel weird.

    Too much work for a word I don't use that ofTen.

  7. #37
    Reformed Perfectionist G.G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Modesty
    I have a new question:
    What is the difference between "as long as", and "so long as". I am quite sure they are both correct as they are both used by JRR Tolkien in his books , and I trust him to know his English, but I don't know what the difference is.
    I had to do some searching on this one. I know what my gut thought was right...and it was wrong! I couldn't find "as long as" in any dictionary, but I did find "so long as". I guess "so long as" is correct...but I think "as long as" sounds better personally.

    Your quote about JRR Tolkien cracks me up - I find more grammar/usage errors in books that you'd realize!

  8. #38
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    GG... I think JJR T is correct as he was a linguist of sorts (someone pls correct me on this one!). I'm quite sure both "as long as" as "so long as" are perfectly correct, though I still wonder what the difference is. (What I learnt in school, btw, was "as long as", and we learnt Queen's English... Oh - and school is pronounced "Skool" )

  9. #39
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    Both are correct, but mean different things.

    "as long as" means "during the entire time that...".
    "so long as" means "provided that..."

    As long as you pay attention to grammar, you'll always have a place in geekdom.

    So long as you do well in school, you'll get into a good college.

    See the difference?

  10. #40
    Reformed Perfectionist G.G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John
    Both are correct, but mean different things.

    "as long as" means "during the entire time that...".
    "so long as" means "provided that..."

    As long as you pay attention to grammar, you'll always have a place in geekdom.

    So long as you do well in school, you'll get into a good college.

    See the difference?
    That makes sense, John. All I did was poke around in a few dictionaries - I went to sleep at 5 AM, woke up at 8:30 and clearly wasn't analytical at all. Is that what I get for expecting the dictionary to do my work?

    I'm surprised no one's mentioned "irregardless" in this tangled grammar web we've woven. Ooooo...I made an alliteration!

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