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Thread: English Corner

  1. #121
    Embracing the Inner Geek museumguy's Avatar
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    I know a computer geek whose company spells innovate "innov8" that would make the eight, if used consistantly, a replacement for ate...which would, in theory make later, "l8r", but it is still wrong to spell eight as ate. Thank God I am not a computer geek.....

  2. #122
    Embracing the Inner Geek museumguy's Avatar
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    I think kewl instead of cool dates to Fast Times at Ridgemont High where it was written with Dude spelled correctly on the blackboard. I love the English language for its abiltity to change rapidly and hope that something quickly replaces kewl, like a return to cool. We could call it retro.

  3. #123
    FORT Newbie SnowedIn's Avatar
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    Oooooh, I have found a thread full of grammar geeks like me. Oh, joy!

    Here's my (latest) pet peeve: around here they say "I should have went that way".

    Grrrrrr. Is this regional, or is it more widespread? I can't work out where it comes from.

    Snow

  4. #124
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    I hear that once in a while, SnowedIn. I hate it, too. I have no idea where it comes from, though.

  5. #125
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Maybe y'all will get a kick out of this: I have friends who make fun of me for saying "might should" or "might could", as in "We might could go to the store later." I think this is just a regionalism I have, because people where I grew up never teased me about saying it, and I think they say it too but I haven't really noticed.
    for those who were peeved about prepositions at the ends of sentences (i.e. "Where is the bathroom AT") there's some quote from I think Winston Churchill about how if you have something important to say, don't worry about the prepositions. When I'm writing I try to notice prepositions but when I'm talking I'm completely guilty of throwing them at the ends of sentences.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  6. #126
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    Where are you from, Lucy (if you don't mind me asking)? I've never heard that. It sounds vaguely Hollywood cowboy - you know, I reckon I might could go out later.

    I had an Irish professor who was always saying he was "after" something to mean it already happened. Example: "I'm after eating the apple" = I already ate the apple. Now crank up the accent about 10 notches, and you have one incomprehensible guy. (But very cute.)
    You've gotta hustle if you want to earn a dollar. - Boston Rob

  7. #127
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hepcat
    Where are you from, Lucy (if you don't mind me asking)? I've never heard that. It sounds vaguely Hollywood cowboy - you know, I reckon I might could go out later.

    I had an Irish professor who was always saying he was "after" something to mean it already happened. Example: "I'm after eating the apple" = I already ate the apple. Now crank up the accent about 10 notches, and you have one incomprehensible guy. (But very cute.)
    I'm from Southwest Virginia, next to West Virginia, deep in Appalachia and coal country. Or rather, I grew up there. Have since moved.
    Anyway, "might could" and "might should" seems to mean "perhaps." Perhaps I could go dancing Friday night. I might could go dancing Friday night. I know I'm not the only one in that region who uses those phrases. I figure it's some holdover from old Scotch-Irish or English idioms.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  8. #128
    daydream believer oneTVslave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy
    I'm from Southwest Virginia, next to West Virginia, deep in Appalachia and coal country. Or rather, I grew up there. Have since moved.
    Anyway, "might could" and "might should" seems to mean "perhaps." Perhaps I could go dancing Friday night. I might could go dancing Friday night. I know I'm not the only one in that region who uses those phrases. I figure it's some holdover from old Scotch-Irish or English idioms.
    I live in Georgia and I have heard people using "might could" down here as well. Actually, I think I have probably slipped up a few times and even said it myself! It is amazing how you begin to emulate the speech patterns of those around you, even if you grew up speaking differently...
    Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.
    - Albert Einstein

  9. #129
    Very Proud Grandpa! LoneStarSpur's Avatar
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    I'm fixin' to get flamed.

    Language is not static. Grammar changes. Common usages can morph into rules years after their adoption by the general population. Find a static language and you'll find Latin.

    Even so, I'm always on my kids' rears about using correct grammar even though mine's not the greatest.

    -Randy

  10. #130
    FORT Newbie SnowedIn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy
    for those who were peeved about prepositions at the ends of sentences (i.e. "Where is the bathroom AT") there's some quote from I think Winston Churchill about how if you have something important to say, don't worry about the prepositions. When I'm writing I try to notice prepositions but when I'm talking I'm completely guilty of throwing them at the ends of sentences.
    I read a story about Winston Churchill at englishplus.com, which was cute. I'm not sure if it is the one Lucy was thinking of, but it went like this:

    Once, when he worked for the Admiralty in World War I, he was rebuked by a superior for putting a preposition at the end of a sentence. He replied by writing back an ironic apology saying that it was "something up with which we should not put." Of course, that was much more awkward than "something we should not put up with." He made his point.

    I am guilty of often putting prepositions at the ends of sentences in speech - I also try not to do it too much when writing.

    Snow

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