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Thread: English Corner

  1. #101
    Embracing the Inner Geek museumguy's Avatar
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    One other comment. In modern English to boldly go and to go boldly do not mean the same thing. After WWII, spliting infinitives has added emphasis so that to go boldly is less bold then to boldly go. We hate the passive voice but sometimes things just happen.

  2. #102
    Princess
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    After WWII, splitting infinitives has added emphasis so that to go boldly is less bold then to boldly go.
    Good point, museumguy! Though I don't know how this is related to WWII?

  3. #103
    Embracing the Inner Geek museumguy's Avatar
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    Modesty, I could have said in the last 60 years, didn't mean to tie the comment literally to the War.

  4. #104
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrammarGoddess
    This thread is getting awfully serious - can't we just make fun of people who say "can you borrow me some money" or "can you learn me how to do that"?
    That made me think of a story my mother used to tell. She was at a dinner party in New York City in the 1960's and asked someone to "reach me the potatoes". A woman from Scotland was there and said she hadn't heard anyone use "reach" in that way since she left Scotland. My mother grew up in the heart of the Appalachian mountains, where a lot of people are of Scottish and Irish descent, and because of the isolation of the mountains, their language was in some ways slow to keep up with the modernization of the English language (at least till TV came along). So my grandparents used phrases that to most people would seem archaic.
    Just wanted to pass along that tidbit.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  5. #105
    RESIDENT JEDI MASTER Stargazer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy
    That made me think of a story my mother used to tell. She was at a dinner party in New York City in the 1960's and asked someone to "reach me the potatoes". A woman from Scotland was there and said she hadn't heard anyone use "reach" in that way since she left Scotland. My mother grew up in the heart of the Appalachian mountains, where a lot of people are of Scottish and Irish descent, and because of the isolation of the mountains, their language was in some ways slow to keep up with the modernization of the English language (at least till TV came along). So my grandparents used phrases that to most people would seem archaic.
    Just wanted to pass along that tidbit.

    Too add to your thoughts-Appalachian dialects are supposed to be closer to ancient United Kingdom dialects than anything you hear in the United Kingdom today.
    "Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter."- Yoda

    "I'll just see where Providence takes me and try to look like I got there confidently." - Craig Ferguson

  6. #106
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stargazer401
    Too add to your thoughts-Appalachian dialects are supposed to be closer to ancient United Kingdom dialects than anything you hear in the United Kingdom today.
    Exactly. I fear that won't last; TV is helping make the world so small that I think regionalisms are on the wane. Already I notice that my cousins and I don't use the sort of idioms that my grandparents did.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  7. #107
    FORT Fogey
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    I love that yall are sooo good at remembering all the written rules and grammar formulas. When it comes to places like this I tend to just type as I speak which when written is full of mistakes I am sure! However, I know that I am pretty intelligent and except for the southen dialect I am not a total grammar hick. I apologize to all you grammar experts who probably go into orbit when reading my posts because they are often full of gramatical errors.

  8. #108
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    I'm married to a linguist who believes all dialects are created equal and should have their own special place in the history of language. He thinks the real evildoers are people like the French who have government-dictated grammar rules.

    I really think it stems from the fact that he's a horrible speller.
    You've gotta hustle if you want to earn a dollar. - Boston Rob

  9. #109
    Boomer Sooner SCRUMPOT's Avatar
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    I just found this thread today. I read it all!! And laugh alot. But, I didn't learn anything at all, did I? hehehehehe.

    I remember an english teacher telling us how to remember to use its and it's correctly. She said that IT never owns (possesses) anything. Something can be hepcat's or firegirl's but it is never it's. I always remember.

    Is anyone annoyed with "Where are you going to?" or "Where do you live at?" Stop it, stop it!!
    "People are strange, when you're a stranger" - Jim Morrison

  10. #110
    Reformed Perfectionist G.G.'s Avatar
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    Oh SCRUMPOT, you reminded of a radio station where I used to live. They had some segment that they billed as "providing information to improve the place in which we live and work IN". DROVE ME NUTS! I could have even turned a blind ear (wait, that should be deaf ear) to the sentence-ending preposition, had they not included the phrase "in which".

    I was always going to call and bring this to their attention, but Miss Manners said it's impolite to correct someone's grammar unless they've ask you to do so(or if they are a message board flamer correcting someone else's and are wrong in their correction of the person they are correcting).

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