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Thread: Dean Koontz

  1. #151
    FORT Fogey eldee's Avatar
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    The first two chapters of Twilight Eyes are already great!


    Haejin, I don't remember if I read Lightning. Let us know how you like it.

  2. #152
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    I think I must've read all the Dean Koontz books. I started by checking them out from the library many years ago, graduated to buying the paperbacks at garage sales, and finally ended up purchasing them new from the book clubs I'm in.
    The last one I read was "Odd Thomas". I don't think he's had another one out since then, has he? I loved "Odd Thomas", but was sad at the end - I won't give it away since some of you may not have read it- I thought it was fitting, however.

    What I haven't seen on here are any comments about the politics of his books. Many of the earlier books are set within a very short timespan - a few days - and yet the characters seem to trust each other very soon in their relationship. Maybe that's wishful thinking on his part, given the things I read on this thread about his early life. It also explains the antagonist role in the book - usually being overpoweringly and fully Evil, with seemingly great powers (until the very end, when he/it is overcome by the forces of Good... )
    The Government has also played a part in many of his books, and is usually portrayed as being omniscient (and evil ). He seems to be a proponent of less is more when it comes to that.

    Sooo, while I really like his books, I think they sometimes follow a pattern:
    Dogs = good
    Government = bad
    and it's okay to trust a person, but bad to trust certain groups;
    But I really get into the whole Good vs Evil thing. I guess that's why I like his books.

    My favorites were "Watchers", "Whispers" and "Midnight"
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

  3. #153
    FORT Fogey eldee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dinahann
    I think I must've read all the Dean Koontz books. .......
    Diahann, I'm go glad that you found this thread! I see that you are quite the "Koontz connoisseur" if you will. I like how you are an active reader, as well as, reading for fun. Since I already know that you are a Koontz "pro" it will be YOUR FAULT if I start asking you questions!

    Currently, I am reading Twilight Eyes and I am enjoying it. I also read Watchers and Midnight but, I don't believe that I read Whispers.

  4. #154
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    I am, too. It is so much FUN to discuss books with someone else that has read them. My Mother is an avid reader but doesn't usually read newer books. My Mother in law mails me boxes of books that she's finished, but hers are all-male protaganist tough, lawyer type things that I read but don't get much out of. Dean Koontz (and Stephen King) are my guilty pleasures.

    Oh, and I re-read sometines, also. Do you sometimes find that you can pick up a book years later and enjoy it all over again?
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

  5. #155
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    One of my other favorite "older" Koontz books is "Dark Rivers of the Heart". A little outrageous in some of the stuff he uses in the book, but it's a very interesting story.

    Also, both of the Christopher Snow books set in Half Moon Bay are very good.

  6. #156
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John
    One of my other favorite "older" Koontz books is "Dark Rivers of the Heart". A little outrageous in some of the stuff he uses in the book, but it's a very interesting story.

    Also, both of the Christopher Snow books set in Half Moon Bay are very good.
    Yes, and you've proved my point about Dog= good and Government= bad. These are the books people like to read (myself included). It's been awhile since I've read "Dark Rivers of the Heart". Is this the book that makes reference to Ruby Ridge?

    And I also enjoyed "Fear Nothing" and "Seize the Night". Koontz's protagonists are always so darn likable. So earnest.
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

  7. #157
    FORT Fogey eldee's Avatar
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    I also noticed his use of dogs and govt. in his stories. Twilight Eyes is the only book that I can remember where the story does not take place in California.

  8. #158
    FORT Fogey cablejockey's Avatar
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    Right now I'm reading Eyes of Darkness----one of his older books I hadn't even heard of til i found it in the library. There are no dogs, it takes place in Nevada, and the government figures in it big and bad. It would make a good movie.

  9. #159
    FORT Fogey eldee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cablejockey
    Right now I'm reading Eyes of Darkness......
    Ah, so many Koontz books, so little time.

  10. #160
    FORT Regular Delphyne's Avatar
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    Koontz came out with a new book yesterday called The Taking.

    Book Description:
    In one of the most dazzling books of his celebrated career, Dean Koontz delivers a masterwork of page-turning suspense that surpasses even his own inimitable reputation as a chronicler of our worst fears?and best dreams. In The Taking he tells the story of a community cut off from a world under siege, and the terrifying battle for survival waged by a young couple and their neighbors as familiar streets become fog-shrouded death traps. Gripping, heartbreaking, and triumphant in the face of mankind?s darkest hour, here is a small-town slice-of-doomsday thriller that strikes to the core of each of us to ask: What would you do in the midst of The Taking.

    On the morning that will mark the end of the world they have known, Molly and Niel Sloan awaken to the drumbeat of rain on their roof. It has haunted their sleep, invaded their dreams, and now they rise to find a luminous silvery downpour drenching their small California mountain town. A strange scent hangs faintly in the air, and the young couple cannot shake the sense of something wrong.

    As hours pass and the rain continues to fall, Molly and Niel listen to disturbing news of extreme weather phenomena across the globe. Before evening, their little town loses television and radio reception. Then telephone and the Internet are gone. With the ceaseless rain now comes an obscuring fog that transforms the once-friendly village into a ghostly labyrinth. By nightfall the Sloans have gathered with some of their neighbors to deal with community damage...but also because they feel the need to band together against some unknown threat, some enemy they cannot identify or even imagine.

    In the night, strange noises arise, and at a distance, in the rain and the mist, mysterious lights are seen drifting among the trees. The rain diminishes with the dawn, but a moody gray-purple twilight prevails. Soon Molly, Niel, and their small band of friends will be forced to draw on reserves of strength, courage, and humanity they never knew they had. For within the misty gloom they will encounter something that reveals in a terrifying instant what is happening to their world?something that is hunting them with ruthless efficiency. Epic in scope, searingly intimate and immediate in perspective, The Taking is an adventure story like no other, a relentless roller-coaster read that brings apocalypse to Main Street and showcases the talents of one of our most original and mesmerizing novelists at the pinnacle of his powers.

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