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Thread: Science Fantasy

  1. #51
    FORT Regular Fantine's Avatar
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    I love sci-fi and fantasy

    I love sci-fi and fantasy and I've read tons of them including Robert Jordan, Terry Goodkind, marion zimmer Bradley, Elizabeth Haydon, Harry Harrison, actually now that I'm remembing it's just too long a list but Robin Hobb I can't forget either of course all the old favorite books like Dune, I Robot, LOTR, I love Harry Potter too
    I suggest a series by Elizabeth Haydon called The Symphony of the ages, I'm on book 5 and I think they are all really good.

  2. #52
    Leia-Jakita-Arendt OnMyLunchBreak's Avatar
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    I just saw on Amazon that A Feast for Crows, the fourth book in George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series with be released NOVEMBER 8TH in the U.S.!

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    FORT Fan Shaybo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by m0ckeryj0nes
    fantasy authors that rock :

    Robert Jordan, Wheel of Time makes Lord of the Rings look superficial and pendantic.
    Tad Williams, War of the Flowers is a fantastic read.
    David WineGrove, Chung Kuo series is a very interesting fantasy/sci fi endeavor.
    Raymond E Fiest - not the best writer but the magician series is a decent read.


    Trashy Sci Fi Authors That Kick A88

    John Ringo And David Weber - March Upcountry series. Incredible action.
    Heinlien - The master to whom we all must bow down.
    Herbert - Dune, and many other lesser knowns.
    Greg Bear - EON, mind mending.
    Niven, Pournelle, foot fall and lucifer's hammer, end of the world sci fi
    Turtledove -fabulous alternate history
    Walter John Williams - The Rift, would make a good movie.
    Robert Silverberg - the majipoor chronicles. entertaining and engrossing



    ahh there are so many more but I'm blanking.....
    I like Heinlien my husband and I have at least 15 16 books written by him. Theres one that I like called Time Enough For Love. We also have some a couple of Herbert books.
    Shaybo

  4. #54
    Best Ever Pool Runner Angry Birds Champion pikachu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emeraldsong View Post
    Eragon is wonderful and amazing especially when you consider that the author is still in his teens. I believe there are two other books to come in the series.

    Another wonderful author that I just started reading is Tamora Pierce. Wonderful alternative world fantasy -- knights and all that good stuff.
    I just got Eragon at Thanksgiving and I've really enjoyed it so far. I found out that they're making a movie of it, due for release next year.

    Eragon the movie

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnowflakeGirl View Post
    When I was younger I loved Asimov, Heinlein, Bradbury, Frank Herbert, Philip K. Dick and Piers Anthony.
    I did miss the genre, so I recently tried getting back into it with some cyberpunk. You know, I had to read Gibson's Neuromancer. I'd like to know if any of you can suggest any good newer titles in this vein. Someone mentioned an awesome new cyberpunk author, sang his praises, and wouldn't you know I just plum forgot the name! I need Gingko Biloba!

    I haven't yet read, but am very interested in, books by Ursula K. Le Guin or Octavia Butler. Can anyone make any recommendations by these authors for me? I've heard great things, but don't know with which titles I should start.
    For Ursula Le Guin I STRONGLY recommend The Left Hand of Darkness--it's one of the best imagined alternative societies I've ever read (you know the kind of thing I mean...one little twist in the way the world is set up and how it plays out)...especially for those interested in gender.
    I like all the authors you mentioned. Several others commented on Heinlein, who started so well and then at the end was really creeping me out. If I'd known whether he had any redheaded daughters or granddaughters I would have been calling Child Protective Services...all these little female clones of the old guy who just were dying to have sex with him... OK, nice to imagine once, but over and over again, with younger and younger girls...way too much like obsession.
    Alexei Panshin's Rite of Passage is a great book--appeals to teenage boys and women equally as I know from experience, but seems to be out of print, findable mostly in used book sites--about a starfaring culture that drops its adolescent teens off on random human inhabited planets and picks up the survivors a month later.
    John Wyndham's books are also great, from the older genre--you probably know Day of the Triffyds but he did lots of others. Again, used sites your best bet.
    Orson Scott Card...hmmm...Loved the beginning of the Alvin Maker series and the Ender series but then I feel they go downhill.

  6. #56
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PWS View Post
    For Ursula Le Guin I STRONGLY recommend The Left Hand of Darkness--it's one of the best imagined alternative societies I've ever read (you know the kind of thing I mean...one little twist in the way the world is set up and how it plays out)...especially for those interested in gender.
    I do like alternative societies. Thanks for the recommendation.

    I like all the authors you mentioned. Several others commented on Heinlein, who started so well and then at the end was really creeping me out.
    I've never been a big fan of Heinlein, either.

    Alexei Panshin's Rite of Passage is a great book--appeals to teenage boys and women equally as I know from experience, but seems to be out of print, findable mostly in used book sites--about a starfaring culture that drops its adolescent teens off on random human inhabited planets and picks up the survivors a month later.
    Intriguing. I'll look into it.

    Orson Scott Card...hmmm...Loved the beginning of the Alvin Maker series and the Ender series but then I feel they go downhill.
    I liked Ender's Game, although I'm aware there are vastly differing opinions on Ender's Game (to say the least). None of the other books has ever sufficiently caught my attention for me to consider buying, borrowing or reading them.

    I am not a fan of fantasy. At all. To me, every fantasy novel seems to read like The Lord of the Rings (Redux).

    I think Robert Jordan is the most egregious example of a Tolkien clone. Man, I hate Robert Jordan novels. Robert Jordan is in my pantheon of authors I will never, ever read...even if I were stranded on a desert island and my choices were (a) go out of my mind with boredom or (b) read a novel by Tom Clancy, Patricia Cornwell, Anne Rice or Robert Jordan.

    As for science-fiction, anyone for Timothy Zahn? I didn't just like the Star Wars books (which tended to get worse as he progressed, although Heir to the Empire was brilliant), but I've run across collections of his short stories and one or two of his novels. The non-SW stuff is a mixed bag, but, overall, I like Timothy Zahn's books enough to recommend them.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  7. #57
    FORT Fanatic tickerrose's Avatar
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    I just recently had a huge urge to re-read all of my old Terry Brooks favorites. I really enjoy his Shannara series and even after all these years am already caught up in the world. You can't beat an old favorite.

  8. #58
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    And for those who like Apocalypse fiction (by which I do NOT mean the Left Behind series, but rather more physical or warfare induced end of the civilized world books), 2 of my favs, other than Day of the Triffyds, were Lucifer's Hammer (which came out way before the asteroid movies) and one whose name I can never recall...maybe someone else read it...a fat book set in France where the survivors happened to be living in an old castle that still functioned well enough on a medieval level to let them live that way. Very vivid scenes of starving people eating grass (sounded like things I've read about the Irish potato famine). I also read Postman after the movie came out--it started out well, but actually for once thought the movie was better. Think it got unfairly panned because reviewers now hate what's-his-name from Dances With Wolves and Waterworld (which I also thought was pretty good).

  9. #59
    FORT Fogey Leftcoaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hepcat View Post
    I also like Robert Heinlein, except for the books at the end of his life where he seemed to get obsessed with carnal relations with younger & younger girls, preferably redheads, possibly close relatives. But for decades his books had compelling plots with a great writing style.
    I've managed to read past a similar quote I saw about Heinlein creeping the poster out, presumably from the same period and for the same or similar reasons, but your's will serve for responding purposes.

    Heinlein did cover more explicit sexual ground toward the end, beginning around the point of Stranger In A Strange Land and I Will Fear No Evil, but its mainly with Lazarus Long and his brood where Heinlein lets it all hang out at moments, not completely. He falls in love with his mother and ends up not only having sex with but impregnating his female clones in Time Enough For Love, but he also spoke of the dangers associated with incest in the same book, and had no intention of taking his female ward who became the love of his life as a lover until she proposed it.

    The Howard families and their longevity provided interesting questions regarding family structure. Its hard to envision the way we look at relationships surviving if people were living for several hundred years.

    It wasn't the sex which was a disappointment to me at the end so much as him offering overall non-compelling stories. I'd have liked to see him try his hand at more short stories than some of the stinker novels he cranked out. He did come out with one or two better books before he was done to dissipate some of the stench.

  10. #60
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    Right, I give him points for never having Lazarus forcing himself on anyone. (And while I wasn't exactly thrilled with the Friday rape scene his point about it being more about hurting her than the sex for the rapists was a good one---I just doubt it would work to end the rape in real life even if one could make oneself respond like Friday did.) BUT it was clearly I thought one of his personal fantasies that young girls fancied wonderful old men--aka him--and even if he never acted on it...ummmm. Not to say that never happens, but it seemed to be Lazarus' universal experience. And unless you are a multi-millionaire and really being fancied for your money it probably isn't the universal experience of many old codgers.
    But I did like the message that old doesn't mean undesirable... starting back in Stranger in a Strange Land as I recall. Just I think one should stay in touch with reality/biology--and maybe when we live near forever this will happen more, but you just got the feeling that he thought it was happening now.
    Re the incest aspects...it's one thing with your mom, who's an adult woman able to make her own choices (even if she doesn't exactly know what she's choosing), another with your kids. I was ok with the mom, and the kids theme once, but it seemed to keep reoccuring over and over, so it seemed like his personal fetish.
    Re the plot lines, agree...but most really popular authors probably stay one or two books too long--look at Agatha Christie's last book for example. We fans keep demanding more and more.

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