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Thread: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

  1. #31
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    Oh, this season is called Challenge America.

    3 teens - 2 are 13 the other is 16

    16 adults

    1 adult in the 50's
    3 are in their 40's
    3 are in their 30's
    9 are in their 20's

    Yeow I hate it when the season seem to have so many young players. (not including the teens). Well maybe the point is if you don't do something in your teens see what you get in your twenties.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  2. #32
    PWS
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    Quote Originally Posted by Bearcata View Post
    9pm to 11pm EST.
    Thanks, Bearcata!

    So the 16 adults are the competitors and the teens are an addition? Will they be in the same setting as the adults? Guess I'm not getting how it works. 16 doesn't divide by 3 evenly, but neither does 19 if you count the teens. Or is Jillian not a team leader but a super coach for all somehow? Or the teen coach? Wonder if it irks Bob if she gets some kind of super status.

    ETA in the previews they seem to show a mob of people, like the time when they had every state submit some contestants, but only a few got on the show.

    ETA I see from the Jillian thread that the kids won't be weighed on TV or eliminated...there's some hint Jillian is only working with the teens....
    Last edited by PWS; 12-30-2012 at 04:20 PM.

  3. #33
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    Biggest Loser Season 14 - Meet the Teens Competing on the Show : People.com

    For 13 seasons The Biggest Loser has helped adults from across the country shed pounds, but when season 14 debuts Jan. 6 and 7, the NBC weight-loss series will be tackling the epidemic of child obesity.

    "This is not their fault," returning trainer (and new mom) Jillian Michaels tells PEOPLE of the one in three children who, according to national studies, are overweight or obese in the U.S. "This is about an introduction to an active lifestyle and helping them feel better about themselves."

    In addition to working with 15 adult contestants, Michaels along with fellow trainers Bob Harper and Dolvett Quince will mentor three teenagers who will train predominately at home and will not weigh in on camera.

    "It is about reeducating them and working on their goals," Michaels says of working with Sanjana Chandrasekar, Lindsay Bravo and Noah Gray.

    Lindsay Bravo, 13
    She began gaining weight after her parents' divorce and eventually quit being a cheerleader because she was bullied for her size.

    "I felt girls were laughing at me because when I jumped, my stomach would go up. I felt very uncomfortable. I would turn around and laugh at what they said and then go home and eat whatever I wanted and go to my room and cry," Bravo, who one day wants to be a gymnast, tells PEOPLE. "My mom would be, like, 'What are you doing?' I would say I saw Titanic and she would say, 'Oh, okay.' I never told my parents."

    Now training predominately with Quince, whom she describes as "really nice," the eighth grader is enjoying the games and exercises the teens are learning to keep active.

    "I've always tried to lose weight in the past and I would always give in to the hot Cheetos or mac and cheese, but this has been really successful with everyone motivating me," the Southern California native says of beginning her Biggest Loser experience. "Now I would love if I could get in a gymnastics class and be comfortable with myself."

    Noah 'Biingo' Gray, 13
    Born in Maryland, he began to put on weight at age 10 when his family moved to Virginia after his father accepted a new job.

    "The economy hit my family really hard and we had to start moving a lot," Gray tells PEOPLE. "It really stressed me out and that caused me to eat more."

    Through his Biggest Loser training, Gray is learning to trade out the "junky foods with all the sugar" that he loves for broccoli even though he still has to mix the broccoli in with other foods he enjoys more.

    "When I leave the [Biggest Loser] Ranch, I hope to be at a more fit stage, says the eighth grader, who wants to improve his skills as a baseball pitcher. "I love baseball with all my heart and I want to be able to keep up with my friends."

    Sanjana 'Sunny' Chandrasekar, 16
    She was born in Chennai, India, and has since moved multiple times around the globe before settling in Rochester, N.Y.

    "I was always 'the new kid' and I would be really lonely a lot of the time and would turn to food as a companion and a friend," Chandrasekar tells PEOPLE. "And while I'm doing homework I might be up until 3 a.m. stressing out and start binge eating."

    Chandrasekar, an aspiring singer, hopes that by leading a healthier lifestyle she will gain the confidence necessary to audition for the lead roles in school plays and musicals that she has always wanted.

    "When I am on stage I am worried that people are looking at how I look rather than listening to what I have to say or sing," says the 11th grader, who is working mostly with Michaels, whom she says "treats us differently than she does the adults."

    In addition to learning to ride bikes with friends rather than go out to eat or to the movies, Chandrasekar is developing a new outlook on life thanks to Michaels.

    "Jillian told me that it is not really about how others perceive you but how you perceive yourself," she says. "Being able to transform my body and how I see myself on the inside is going to be really healthier for me later in life."

    In addition to the teens, 15 adults will compete on teams, each led by one of the Biggest Loser trainers. "Each team of adults will be paired with one child participant who will compete with and contribute to their respective teams," according to a press release from NBC. However, the teens will not be up for elimination.
    Last edited by Bearcata; 12-30-2012 at 04:53 PM.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  4. #34
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    Quote Originally Posted by Bearcata View Post
    Oh, this season is called Challenge America.

    3 teens - 2 are 13 the other is 16

    16 adults

    1 adult in the 50's
    3 are in their 40's
    3 are in their 30's
    9 are in their 20's

    Yeow I hate it when the season seem to have so many young players. (not including the teens). Well maybe the point is if you don't do something in your teens see what you get in your twenties.
    My bad 15 adults, 8 in their 20's. 3 teams of 5 adults and 1 teen.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  5. #35
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    This makes more sense to me. I had not read much about what was going to happen.
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  6. #36
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    I think this will be eye opening to so many viewers. If you don't teach kids when they are young to eat healthy and be active....and how to deal with stresses, changes, life in general then when they reach their 20's they are obese. I think the reason there is always more contestants in their 20's than any other age every season is because generations before us ate healthier. I know older people obese but the ratio between those in their 40's compared to those in their 20's is big.
    "Where you are today is where your mind put you. Where you'll be tomorrow is where your mind puts you." Billy Banks

  7. #37
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    I am not sure we ate healthier, but we were more active. Growing up we did not have video games, but played outside.
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  8. #38
    Go CATS!!!! mandmmom2's Avatar
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    Us too and growing up my parents really didn't teach us healthy eating. But my dad was raised on a farm so we had a huge garden in the back yard and our meat came from my uncle who took over the farm. I didn't know any of this until college when vending machines became my norm. We never went out to eat growing up either. During lent my dad brought home fish every Friday even though we weren't Catholics anymore. Everything was home made growing up. I remember the first time I had Jiff....

    My parents taught us to eat three meals a day to sustain you and there was no laying around being "bored". If you so much as said the word "bored" you had something to do for the next week!!!!!
    "Where you are today is where your mind put you. Where you'll be tomorrow is where your mind puts you." Billy Banks

  9. #39
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    Both my parents had grown up in rural areas and both families had large gardens and both parents stayed pretty slim all their lives. I remember growing up having 3 square meals a day. Potato chips were a treat and my mom would buy a bag once a week and it was gone. Even in grade school, in Canada, we all walked home for lunch. When I moved to the state I thought it was weird to have to take a bus to school and to have a bagged lunch or to have a cafeteria. I didn't have problems with my weight until I went to college and had my own money and went nuts on sweets because I never really had that much access to them before. Even then the weight didn't really start to pile on until I was working and trying to get my career started. When I look back at it if I had just stuck to 3 regular meals a day plus a snack or two I would be able to maintain a healthy weight with an occasional treat without any problems.

    Also when I finally moved to DC and was eating out a lot I thought something was wrong with me because I couldn't eat the restaurant size portions and I started shoveling food into my mouth. It also took me a while to figure out that I didn't need to eat the bread, the super size salad with tons of dressing and a ginormous dessert.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  10. #40
    PWS
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    Re: Season 14 - Will Be a Mid Season Replacement Show

    Well, walking home for lunch every day depends on a parent being home at noon every day to fix it, serve it, supervise. Been quite a few years since that was the norm.....
    One year we were going to do a sabbatical overseas...this was early 80's and I visited a lot of schools, etc., trying to figure out what would work best with our 2nd and 4th grade kids. In Germany I was told that kids came home for lunch every day, and that if the teacher was out sick no sub was called in, the kids were just sent home. Mom was just supposed to sit in the house all day waiting I guess. Or the 7 year old was supposed to know how to get home and take care of himself safely at home. Of course the Germans also didn't believe in babysitters...to get one for my one year old on an earlier trip we basically had to bribe a teen who was going to be doing a junior year abroad thing with the idea that now they would have a family outside of their host family that they could call on for help. They think we obsess over fire (I guess because there are more stone houses there...).
    OK, wandering from the topic!! I do agree that pre video games and TV we spent a whole lot more time outside. My kids were young just before handheld videogames appeared, and when they did the kids were instantly obsessed. Scary.

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