+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 16 FirstFirst 123456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 156

Thread: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

  1. #11
    FORT Fan
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    185

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    I've heard different percentages for how much of weight loss comes from what you eat vs. how much you exercise. Jillian has said on the show that it's as much as 80% based on diet. I don't know that there's a really good way to do the research and verify the number and I've never seen any research on it, but I have heard it from a number of different sources. I will say from my experience that I've lost a good bit of weight many times without exercising, but I've never been successful at keeping it off until I exercised regularly.

    Personally, I think Tracey's strategy is a good one. No, it won't win her any friends, but partners need to be split up so they can't gang up on you. And really, why all the drama over losing your partner? Rudy was still supporting and encouraging Dina. Danny was still supporting and encouraging Liz. And why wouldn't you want to be split up, so you could keep an eye on what both teams are doing? "Divide and conquer!" seemed to work quite well for Ron and Mike last season.

  2. #12
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,046

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    I regularly burn 1500+ calories per day in training/conditioning and I pretty much eat what I want and don't count calories. I do tend to eat healthily though--fruit, veggies, lean protein, legumes etc. And I eat regularly throught the day at about 3-4 hour intervals--and I make sure I eat an adequate amount of protein and carbs before I start my daily 2-3 hour workout/training session. That way I never get excessively hungry and I consequently don't binge or even eat too much at one sitting.

    So even though I've never ever been on any sort of restricted calorie intake (what most people call a "diet")--when I first started training I lost over 40 pounds in about 4 months without even doing any dieting/restriction of calorie intake.

    And I have maintained that loss and am in the lower range of the BMI for my height. So--I don't think that a blanket statement can be made about what percentage is diet versus calorie burning--my weight loss/muscle-weight maintenance comes from calorie burning and not from any dietary/caloric restrictions.

    It is interesting to hear the different ways that people lose weight though.
    Last edited by Wind Dancer; 10-15-2009 at 12:07 PM.

  3. #13
    FORT Fan
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    281

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    Quote Originally Posted by Wind Dancer;3728347;
    I regularly burn 1500+ calories per day in training/conditioning and I pretty much eat what I want and don't count calories. I do tend to eat healthily though--fruit, veggies, lean protein, legumes etc. And I eat regularly throught the day at about 3-4 hour intervals--and I make sure I eat an adequate amount of protein and carbs before I start my daily 2-3 hour workout/training session. That way I never get excessively hungry and I consequently don't binge or even eat too much at one sitting.

    So even though I've never ever been on any sort of restricted calorie intake (what most people call a "diet")--when I first started training I lost over 40 pounds in about 4 months without even doing any dieting/restriction of calorie intake.

    And I have maintained that loss and am in the lower range of the BMI for my height. So--I don't think that a blanket statement can be made about what percentage is diet versus calorie burning--my weight loss/muscle-weight maintenance comes from calorie burning and not from any dietary/caloric restrictions.

    It is interesting to hear the different ways that people lose weight though.
    I think you're right, it's probably impossible to put a blanket percentage on how much of weight loss comes from diet and how much from exercise. It depends on the size of the person, how much they are exercising and eating, and how much they were exercising and eating BEFORE they started losing weight. I don't think many people have the time or the commitment for daily 2-3 hour, 1500 calorie workouts, though, which is probably why your experience is so different from what might be considered the "norm".

  4. #14
    as always just my opinion Marlena_M's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,923

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    Quote Originally Posted by sjjmom;3728429;
    I think you're right, it's probably impossible to put a blanket percentage on how much of weight loss comes from diet and how much from exercise. It depends on the size of the person, how much they are exercising and eating, and how much they were exercising and eating BEFORE they started losing weight. I don't think many people have the time or the commitment for daily 2-3 hour, 1500 calorie workouts, though, which is probably why your experience is so different from what might be considered the "norm".
    A refreshing and realistic post Thank you!
    Last edited by Marlena_M; 10-15-2009 at 02:26 PM.

    Personally I find these humane mouse traps rather ineffective. Better to lay down some glue and when you hear the critter scream you take a shovel to his head.

  5. #15
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Edge of the Beltway
    Posts
    16,386

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    Quote Originally Posted by Wind Dancer;3728347;
    I regularly burn 1500+ calories per day in training/conditioning and I pretty much eat what I want and don't count calories. I do tend to eat healthily though--fruit, veggies, lean protein, legumes etc. And I eat regularly throught the day at about 3-4 hour intervals--and I make sure I eat an adequate amount of protein and carbs before I start my daily 2-3 hour workout/training session. That way I never get excessively hungry and I consequently don't binge or even eat too much at one sitting.

    So even though I've never ever been on any sort of restricted calorie intake (what most people call a "diet")--when I first started training I lost over 40 pounds in about 4 months without even doing any dieting/restriction of calorie intake.

    And I have maintained that loss and am in the lower range of the BMI for my height. So--I don't think that a blanket statement can be made about what percentage is diet versus calorie burning--my weight loss/muscle-weight maintenance comes from calorie burning and not from any dietary/caloric restrictions.

    It is interesting to hear the different ways that people lose weight though.
    You are taking the statement way out of context.

    I have heard this statement several times from trainers and read in magazines.

    Diet & Exercise - The 8020 Rule Of Weight Loss - 1 Simple Strategy To Finally Take It All Off



    The 8020 rule is often referred to as the Pareto Principle. It was discovered by the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who observed that 80% of the wealth in Europe was owned by 20% of the population. The rule simply put states that a majority (80%) of success or results in life will come from a few (20%) of actions or efforts. It's not always 80% to 20% but the idea is to shift your focus from the trivial many to the vital few efforts which will bring you the greatest results. For example, did you know?

    If you are in sales, 20% or a few of your customers account for 80% of your sales. Question is should you then treat everyone equally? Hmmh...
    20% of your products account for 80% of your profits. Should you marketing budget be allocated equally?
    You wear the same few clothes and shoes 80% of the time.
    A few or your bills account for 80% of your expenses in a month, such as mortgage, car payment etc
    Look at your most recent cell phone bill. You dial the same few numbers on your most of the time
    The List is endless, but you get the idea. The secret to success is to focus on the vital few (the 20%) and not on the trivial many (the 80%) So what does this have to do with weight loss. I think it's everything.



    The 8020 Rule of weight loss is simply burning more calories than you consume. I'm not the biggest fan of counting calories because I believe what you eat also matters. I preach healthful nutrition but if you have ever struggled with losing weight, you need to be aware of how many calories you are consuming. There was a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that discovered that people who started keeping a food journal and wrote down everything they ate realized that they had been underestimating their calorie consumption by an average of 1,053 calories a day which is a lot. Most people are shocked when they find out that a single bagel with cheese and coffee can be close to 600 calories. So if you are on a 1200 calorie diet that's half your caloric requirement gone in one single meal.



    There is a great calorie calculator available at Healthy Low Fat Recipes, Diet Plans, Holiday Recipes, & Free Online Diets | Foodfit



    Get your recommended caloric requirements to achieve or maintain your ideal weight and spread these in 5-6 small meals per day. It's really that simple but very powerful. Add a little exercise and you have yourself a brand new body!
    Last edited by Bearcata; 10-15-2009 at 02:48 PM.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  6. #16
    as always just my opinion Marlena_M's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,923

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    Bearcata, thank you for posting that. Glad you were able to find it!!

    Personally I find these humane mouse traps rather ineffective. Better to lay down some glue and when you hear the critter scream you take a shovel to his head.

  7. #17
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Edge of the Beltway
    Posts
    16,386

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    There is another definition also of the 80/20 rule:

    The 80/20 Diet: 12 Weeks to a Better ... - Google Books

    Which basically says that 80% of the time you need to stick to good eating habits, clean proteins, veggies etc and 20% of the time , roughly 1 day during the week you can indulge your cravings.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  8. #18
    To the Point
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2,672

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    Wind Dancer, I could go back and grab the post to which I'm referring but I think I can do this without having to go back, soooo.....

    There is a difference in something being hard/difficult and something being impossible to achieve. I'm a martial art student and one of the things that our Master Instructors are always reminding us is that if it was easy then everyone would be a black belt, and trust me, at our school, it isn't easy. It's not about how easy or difficult something is, it is about how much you want it and recognizing what it will take to get to the prize. Push ups are difficult when you begin and it's not ALL in your head. It takes physical strength to make it happen, however you do have to make up your mind that you can do it and then work to make it happen. It's a process.

    While I think we both understand the basics of the process, I just think we have different mindsets about getting there. It takes different things/different ways of looking at things for different people.

    BTW, I'm very impressed that you devote that much time to working out/training. As someone else said most of us don't/can't/won't devote that much time.

  9. #19
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Edge of the Beltway
    Posts
    16,386

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    Another example of the 80/20 principle.

    USA WEEKEND Magazine

    Resolve to be "good" 80% of the time
    Get real, says Dr. Tedd Mitchell. Strict health routines won't work because you won't stick with them. Do what he does: Eat and exercise sensibly during the week, then relax all weekend.

    By Tedd Mitchell, M.D.

    any people start out the new year resolving to adopt healthier lifestyles: lots of exercise, no fatty foods or sweets, no alcohol. And within a few weeks, they've given up those good resolutions. The problem is that any resolution to "give up" a particular food or "always" exercise is unrealistic. What I tell my patients, and what I do myself, is try to exercise and eat healthfully most of the time. More specifically, eat right and exercise five days a week, then feast on the weekends and be a couch potato.


    Dr. Mitchell's 80/20 diet

    In other words, be "good" 80% of the time and you can be "bad" 20% of the time -- more or less. I call it the 80/20 program. (OK -- if you do the math, it works out closer to 70/30. But it feels like 80/20.)

    Here's my routine: My wife and I work out five days a week, Monday through Friday. Five days a week, Janet does a combination of the elliptical trainer and the Stairmaster, or she power-walks. I jog. Then we both get in two 30-minute sessions of strength training during the week. If we get busy at work and have to deviate from our schedule one day, that's fine. But if we miss a second day, we make up for it on the weekend.

    We get up at 5 every morning to be sure we get our workouts in while the kids are asleep and before the day gets too busy. On the weekends, we sleep in and don't work out.

    With our diets, we follow the same schedule. We eat healthful foods beginning with Sunday dinner, then every Friday night we take the whole family to Taco Diner, where I always have the fajita beef tacos. Saturday morning, we go out for doughnuts. But Sunday evening, we're back on the plan, usually with a light dinner of cereal and skim milk or sandwiches.

    One thing that happens when you start on this program is a tendency to pig out on the weekends. But soon you learn to make better bad decisions. I used to eat a dozen doughnuts on Saturday mornings; now I eat three.

    If you have a work event or a special evening out during the week, do a swap: Eat what you want that night and enjoy it, then eat healthfully one weekend night.

    We don't drink any alcohol during the week because it's empty calories. But Friday nights, I'll have a mango margarita. Limiting alcohol to one or two nights a week keeps you in a consumption range that's best for you. The latest studies all suggest that two to seven drinks a week provide health benefits, especially in minimizing heart attacks and strokes. (If you don't drink, don't start, but if you do drink, limit yourself to seven drinks a week.)

    Our children -- Katherine, 8, Charlie, 6, and Christopher, 4 -- follow the same program we do. They don't have sweets during the week, so it's really a treat when we go to Baskin-Robbins on the weekend.

    During the week
    (starting Sunday night):

    * Don't skip meals. Eat a light breakfast and lunch so you're not ravenous at dinner.
    * Avoid eating out. If you do eat out, follow the Restaurant Rules (below).
    * Drink 8-10 servings of water daily.
    * Eat low-calorie/ high-volume foods during the day (fruits and vegetables) to keep you feeling full.
    * Prepare foods by dry baking (no fat added), dry broiling, grilling, poaching or steaming instead of frying.
    * Start meals with volume: salads, raw vegetables, low-fat soups.
    * Eat meat in only 3-4 meals a week.
    * Don't have second helpings.

    On the weekend
    (starting Friday night):

    * Enjoy!
    Eat slowly. Eating fast leads to getting stuffed.
    * Sip water and diet beverages throughout meals.
    * Have dessert with evening meals.
    * Get back into the "workweek" mind-set on Sunday night with a low-calorie meal. Restaurant rules
    * Frequent restaurants you know, with varied menus and low-calorie options.
    * Decide your order ahead of time.
    * Have butter, gravy and salad dressings served on the side (avoid them completely during the week).
    * Have bread, crackers and chips removed to avoid temptation.
    * Choose appetizers as entrees.
    Opt for poultry and fish instead of beef and pork.
    Avoid fried foods, casseroles, cream and cheese sauces, and large meat portions (over 6 ounces).
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  10. #20
    chavy chaf chaf Asteroids Champion, Bejeweled 2 Champion, GalaGalaGa Champion, Add It Up Champion, Beat The Meter Champion, BejeweledŽ 2 Action Champion, Little Protectors Champion spockwhat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,192

    Re: 10/13 Show Discussion **SPOILERS**

    Thanks for the info, Bearcata. I totally follow the 80/20 principle but I do it daily. I eat well all day and treat myself for 20 percent of it. I used to do the "behave all week and enjoy the weekend" but I found I felt like garbage all weekend, so the daily thing works better for me. By the way, my Big Mac yesterday evening had 45 percent of my daily intake of protein! That's the only good thing about it, so that's all I'm saying. And today is going to have to be a 95/5 percent day to make up for it. :p

    Wind Dancer, may I ask how old you are? I admit, when I was younger, I used to easily be able to burn 500-700 cals a day with some weight training and a long bike ride, but 1500 cals and 2-3 hours is a LOT!

    I ended up with sciatic nerve problems and part of the reason was that my doctor felt I was overtraining. I've completely brought it down. A walk (3 k) or a short bike ride (10 k) or swimming, but nothing longer than an hour a day. Of course, I'm not trying to lose weight either, I'm just working out to stay fit.

    I still think that the bigger you are, the more diet affects your weight loss. The smaller you get, the more workouts become necessary. It's just logical.

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.