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Thread: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

  1. #21
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    The maddening thing is that "eat less and exercise more" keeps coming up doesn't it? LOL! So simple and so elusive.

    I, too, grew up with 3 meals and no snacking. When I was young and on my own I really ate only once a day. Not healthy, they cry, but that is what young single people do. I had no problem with my weight and I attribute that to not having a hyper focus on food in general. After kids and a lifestyle change I now am battling 25 pounds. Not much in the scale of this show, but all being relative it is frustrating.

    The numbers I have always heard were 80% nutrition, 10% genetics and 10% exercise.
    This is where my theory enters the picture. I think by not eating properly, genetics and lack of exercise we have created a situation in our bodies that skew the hunger signals to our brain. This is what I think researchers will find. Now the fix for this is most likely life style changes for most of us and medication for the morbidly obese. So nothing has changed really other than trying to find emotional reasons which is not everyone's problem. And they may come up with other things to do to correct the problem, as well.

    .
    Last edited by shoepie; 12-12-2008 at 10:46 AM.

  2. #22
    FORT Fogey Missyboxers's Avatar
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    Quote Originally Posted by shoepie;3250077;

    This is where my theory enters the picture. I think by not eating properly, genetics and lack of exercise we have created a situation in our bodies that skew the hunger signals to our brain. This is what I think researchers will find. Now the fix for this is most likely life style changes for most of us and medication for the morbidly obese. So nothing has changed really other than trying to find emotional reasons which is not everyone's problem. And they may come up with other things to do to correct the problem, as well.

    .
    I think there's something to that. I can't remember where, but I heard/read once that if you think you're hungry, you should first try drinking a glass of water and wait a certain amount of time. If after that, you're still hungry, then you're probably actually hungry, but quite often one will find that they were actually thirsty/dehydrated.

    Then there's also the issue of bored eating- boredom manifesting itself as hunger. So I'm sure a lot of it's hormonal/chemical.

  3. #23
    PWS
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    And, from my experience, when you've lost a lot, as I did on the protein diet, when you go off it you have terrible cravings for fat...may be fat with sugar or fat with salt, but fat. You can eat other things so you are not hungry, but your body wants the fat... Or rather your brain. There's some interesting research on the effects of fattening foods on brain chemicals...I think it is much like the cravings drug addicts get, to hit those same chemicals. I don't know if being fat we just get used to a particular level of those chemicals or if by eating food that stimulates them we've reduced the body's natural ability to creat them, but we really want them. I was completely like a drug addict, tearing the house apart looking for something that would satisfy that craving. It reminded me of watching my parents search for a cigarette or for coffee in the am---my family's drugs of choice when I was a child---just frantic. Totally put me off both smoking and coffee for life!
    I vowed then not to go on another big diet until I had some better solution as to what I was going to do when I got to where I wanted to be. (You don't have the cravings on the protein diet once you go into ketosis as your body chem is changed. Similarly I didn't have them the one other time I lost a lot of weight--back in the early days of "diet doctors" when the doctor put me on something that I'm now sure were amphetamines [legal then], although he didn't tell me that.)
    In my younger days when I was "naturally" thin, I never had cravings like that...nor do I usually when I'm just being my overweight self--only when I've lost a lot.

  4. #24
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    Quote Originally Posted by shoepie;3250077;
    This is where my theory enters the picture. I think by not eating properly, genetics and lack of exercise we have created a situation in our bodies that skew the hunger signals to our brain.
    .
    I think you're absolutely right. But I also think that alot of us don't ever even listen to our brains or our bodies. I know I mindlessly eat when bored or upset and end up being so stuffed I'm sick to my stomach and near to vomiting. I bought the Paul McKenna program and within just a few days I'd lost 5 lbs easily. I was amazed (but shouldn't have been) by how eating without distractions (ie., not in front of the tv or computer), chewing each mouthful many times, and concentrating on where my satisfaction level was and stopping then helped me to eat 1/4 of my normal food volume. For me, eating is a pasttime, a celebration, a friend, a comforter, etc. All the things it SHOULDN'T be.

  5. #25
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    Humans used to be farmers and/or laborers. Now we are desk-monkeys. Our bodies haven't adapted to the changes that came about with the industrial revolution.

    Toss in genetic predisposition, and some people have nothing but an uphill battle.

  6. #26
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    Quote Originally Posted by PWS;3250414;
    And, from my experience, when you've lost a lot, as I did on the protein diet, when you go off it you have terrible cravings for fat...may be fat with sugar or fat with salt, but fat. You can eat other things so you are not hungry, but your body wants the fat... Or rather your brain. There's some interesting research on the effects of fattening foods on brain chemicals...I think it is much like the cravings drug addicts get, to hit those same chemicals. I don't know if being fat we just get used to a particular level of those chemicals or if by eating food that stimulates them we've reduced the body's natural ability to creat them, but we really want them. I was completely like a drug addict, tearing the house apart looking for something that would satisfy that craving. It reminded me of watching my parents search for a cigarette or for coffee in the am---my family's drugs of choice when I was a child---just frantic. Totally put me off both smoking and coffee for life!
    I vowed then not to go on another big diet until I had some better solution as to what I was going to do when I got to where I wanted to be. (You don't have the cravings on the protein diet once you go into ketosis as your body chem is changed. Similarly I didn't have them the one other time I lost a lot of weight--back in the early days of "diet doctors" when the doctor put me on something that I'm now sure were amphetamines [legal then], although he didn't tell me that.)
    In my younger days when I was "naturally" thin, I never had cravings like that...nor do I usually when I'm just being my overweight self--only when I've lost a lot.
    I hear you. This is a calorie game. It doesn't matter if your day consists of steamed vegetables, boned chicken breasts sauteed in PAM, fat free cheese and rice cakes. OR bacon and eggs, salad with real dressing and cuban pork. If you eat 1200 calories you will have a loss. Doesn't matter what it is.

    A huge problem with maintaining a loss is satisfaction. People are led to believe they have to eat "diet food" the rest of their life. Well at some point you want to eat something satisfying. Do it, just put it in the count. You get more volume of food when you eat austerely but fat in a meal carries you much farther in sating appetite and satisfaction. I do this when I have to peel off some weight. It is all about the right head set for me to gather steam for counting calories. It is the only thing that works for me and it works well when I am able to get a charge to do it.

    When I saw Ali measuring her deli turkey to place inside a dry pita I shook my head in wonder. That just cannot last a lifetime nor should it.

  7. #27
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    Quote Originally Posted by shoepie;3250683;

    When I saw Ali measuring her deli turkey to place inside a dry pita I shook my head in wonder. That just cannot last a lifetime nor should it.
    No, but I know from experience with WW, that if you weigh 4 ozs. of sliced turkey enough times, you get to know how much it is and you don't have to measure after a while. When I lost this 40 lbs. that's come back to visit (it's NOT going to be a permanent addition!) with WW, I got to know over 7 mos. how much of what I could eat over the course of a day to lose and then later, to maintain. But if I chose to eat something I wasn't sure of, I'd look up the points and take it into account. When I fell off the wagon wasn't when I stopped measuring, it was when I stopped caring and started binging and stopped paying attention.

  8. #28
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    Quote Originally Posted by loverofdogs18;3250710;
    No, but I know from experience with WW, that if you weigh 4 ozs. of sliced turkey enough times, you get to know how much it is and you don't have to measure after a while. When I lost this 40 lbs. that's come back to visit (it's NOT going to be a permanent addition!) with WW, I got to know over 7 mos. how much of what I could eat over the course of a day to lose and then later, to maintain. But if I chose to eat something I wasn't sure of, I'd look up the points and take it into account. When I fell off the wagon wasn't when I stopped measuring, it was when I stopped caring and started binging and stopped paying attention.
    My point was not to weigh or measure. I always do when on a tear. I meant you do not have to eat deli turkey on dry pita. Count, weigh and measure something more satisfying. 1200 calories is 1200 calories. Just saying that depriving yourself of fat or something you really want only leads to trouble. Put it in the count. Nothing is off limits.

  9. #29
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    Quote Originally Posted by shoepie;3250683;
    I hear you. This is a calorie game. It doesn't matter if your day consists of steamed vegetables, boned chicken breasts sauteed in PAM, fat free cheese and rice cakes. OR bacon and eggs, salad with real dressing and cuban pork. If you eat 1200 calories you will have a loss. Doesn't matter what it is.

    A huge problem with maintaining a loss is satisfaction. People are led to believe they have to eat "diet food" the rest of their life. Well at some point you want to eat something satisfying. Do it, just put it in the count. You get more volume of food when you eat austerely but fat in a meal carries you much farther in sating appetite and satisfaction. I do this when I have to peel off some weight. It is all about the right head set for me to gather steam for counting calories. It is the only thing that works for me and it works well when I am able to get a charge to do it.

    When I saw Ali measuring her deli turkey to place inside a dry pita I shook my head in wonder. That just cannot last a lifetime nor should it.
    Gosh, add some greens, some slice tomato, cucumbers, add a little balsamic and olive oil and that would be a great meal.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  10. #30
    FORT Fanatic hikari's Avatar
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    Re: A Testament to how hard it is to keep it off!

    The lifestyle bootcamp of the ranch is an extreme situation that will never be duplicated. It stands to reason that their bodies regain some weight after the return home and a downgrade to a more 'normal' working out schedule (even if that means still 3 hours a day!) Also, portion control is a continual issue--even when one is making healthy choices, it's easy to overestimate how much a portion really is. 1200 -1400 calories for the women on a weight-loss program is really very little food. Our bodies are wired up to take in and hold onto energy in the form of stored fat, so losing weight is actually a very unnatural state for the body to be in. It regards the weight loss as a crisis and will do anything from slowing itself down to upping the appetite to recapture some of its lost calories of energy.

    BL contestants undergo an exceedingly rigorous program. To lose 100 pounds in 12 weeks is insanely fast. That would normally take 1-2 full years on a more moderate program. The advantage to going slowly is that it gives the body time to adjust to its smaller mass. The BL contestants have not had that time; their bodies are still in shock. Also, they've achieved their unbelievable weight losses in a rigidly controlled environment. On the ranch, they didn't have to do anything but focus on working out; their meals are all pre-planned for them; they didn't have to work a job, care for children or a home or go food shopping or contend with restaurants. Not surprised they haven't REALLY learned how to navigate real-world situations without putting weight on.

    As a rule, I think most of the finalists arrive at the finale a good 10-15 pounds underweight (think of Mark last season). The focus on winning throws some of them into almost an exercise bulimia state. Again, the body must rebel against such stringencies. Life happens; the only thing to do is to regard each new day as a fresh opportunity to make good choices with food and exercise. As long as they don't get back to where they were, they have still succeeded.

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