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Thread: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

  1. #111
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by PWS;3754687;
    When you look at that and consider how few calories an hour of even running burns, it is AMAZING that these contestants are losing double digits week after week... or even 4 or 5 lbs. Yes, they exercise up to 8 hours a day, but they do NOT eat that low a calorie intake.

    To lose 10 lbls in a week, you'd have to burn 35,000 fewer calories than you eat. That's a "shortage" of 5000 calories a day. Even if you exercised 10 hours a day you'd have to be burning at least 500 calories an hour. There are not a lot of exercises that burn at that rate....and I think even on TBL people don't exercise for 10 straight hours. The one thing going for them is that at their weights they burn a lot more calories than a "normal" sized person working at the same rate, especially when doing something like running. I guess that's why we see them on the treadmill so often.

    I do biking at a fairly intense rate of 20+ miles per hour.

    At that rate I burn about 600+ calories per hour. Which for me is about 1200+ calories per day for biking. Weightlifting and other conditioning work burns up the rest.

    (BTW-- losing 10 lbs per week--as is done on BL--is not healthy and is not conducive to long term weight loss.)

  2. #112
    FORT Fogey MamaAmyG's Avatar
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by PWS;3754687;
    When you look at that and consider how few calories an hour of even running burns, it is AMAZING that these contestants are losing double digits week after week... or even 4 or 5 lbs. Yes, they exercise up to 8 hours a day, but they do NOT eat that low a calorie intake.
    To lose 10 lbls in a week, you'd have to burn 35,000 fewer calories than you eat. That's a "shortage" of 5000 calories a day. Even if you exercised 10 hours a day you'd have to be burning at least 500 calories an hour. There are not a lot of exercises that burn at that rate....and I think even on TBL people don't exercise for 10 straight hours. The one thing going for them is that at their weights they burn a lot more calories than a "normal" sized person working at the same rate, especially when doing something like running. I guess that's why we see them on the treadmill so often.
    i'm sure what plays into it in a large part is... i forget the actual term, but the amount of calories it takes to maintain your body weight. we're burning calories every second we're alive, even while we sleep. but it takes more calories to maintain the body systems of a 300 pound person than it does a 150 pound person.

    so, yes, you have a great point with the numbers, but as far as double-digit weight loss, their weight helps them. i might burn 500 calories an hour running at my size, but someone twice my size will burn more, and they'll get to that 3,500 pound deficit much quicker and easier than i would
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  3. #113
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by OneSillyGirl;3754954;
    I'm using the hand grip monitor on the treadmill at the fitness center.
    You know, I find those handgrip monitors to be really unreliable. I've worked out long enough to have a good idea of how I'm handling a workload on any given day and I've gotten readings that I know are off. Personally, I no longer bother to take my heart rate after or during a workout. I don't find it useful as a guide in monitoring my fitness level.

    If you're using equipment at a fitness centre, there are probably personal trainers that could help you with your weight-loss goals. I can tell you this, though - the harder you work, the more fat you will burn. You will not suffer a loss in muscle mass unless you consume too few calories and/or eat poorly.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
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  4. #114
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    AJane--very well said.

  5. #115
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    Thanks AJane and Wind Dancer! I appreciate your feedback. I will check out the website you mentioned. I think I'll break down and fork out some money for the personal trainer. I'm sure it will be money well spent.

  6. #116
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    OSG--hi.
    You're welcome.

    I never had a personal trainer--I did have a friend who offered some guidance when I was starting my training/conditioining but in terms of actual info about the kinds of issues we're talking about, I learned from my own experiences plus a lot of reading in a very wide variety of sources.

    That has worked well for me but I understand that different people have different circumstances and experiences.

    I wish you well on your heallthy path. And let us know how things are going for you. And of course bring other questions too. It's always fun and interesting to see how well other people are doing.

  7. #117
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by OneSillyGirl;3754771;
    I am very confused about aerobic vs. anaerobic exercise and how heart rate during cardio plays into weight loss. I jog several times a week for 45 minutes at a slow speed (5 miles/hr) and my heart rate can get up as high as 192-195. I am 39 yrs old with a minimum of 20 lbs to lose. I'm not at the point I feel like I'm ready to throw up or pass out, otherwise I would stop exercising. I sweat a lot, too. I've heard it's not good to have your heart rate this high b/c that means you're burning muscle, not fat. If I slow down, I don't feel like I'm getting a good work out. Any guidance would be appreciated.

    OneSillyGirl,

    I did a bit of research and found some articles that hopefully will give you a more clear and precise answer to your question.

    Aerobic vs. Anaerobic: What is The Difference? :: Provided by MyFoodDiary.com


    Aerobic vs. Anaerobic: What is The Difference?

    QUESTION:

    I've heard the terms aerobic and anaerobic a lot. What do these terms actually mean and are they important for my exercise program?

    ANSWER:

    Strictly speaking, the terms "aerobic" and "anaerobic" refer to the presence and absence of oxygen, respectively. Most of our cells prefer to get their energy by using oxygen to fuel metabolism. During exercise with adequate fuel and oxygen (i.e., aerobic), muscle cells can contract repeatedly without fatigue. During anaerobic or non-oxygen conditions (i.e., higher intensity exercise), muscle cells must rely on other reactions that do not require oxygen to fuel muscle contraction. This anaerobic metabolism in the cells produces waste molecules that can impair muscle contractions. We call this deterioration in performance fatigue.

    Fatigue causes you to experience added discomfort and weakening muscles. Eventually you will need to slow down and lower your exercise intensity. Slowing down allows the muscles to once again rely solely on aerobic metabolism and support the removal or chemical conversion of waste molecules.

    The problem with the terms "aerobic" and "anaerobic" when applied to exercise is that we actually never switch from total aerobic to total anaerobic metabolic conditions. In reality, the more intensely we exercise, the greater the need for anaerobic energy production. Consequently, it is best to view the terms aerobic and anaerobic as transitions in metabolism, where the proportion between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism changes depending on exercise intensity.

    For example, while at rest, we rely on aerobic metabolism to fuel almost all our body's needs for energy. As we start to exercise, such as progressing from sitting to a slow walk, the increased energy needs of muscle contraction require that we increase our breathing and oxygen intake. So long as we increase our exercise intensity slowly, we can maintain our muscles' dependence on aerobic metabolism, and we don't experience symptoms of fatigue.

    However, as exercise intensity increases, the need for energy release eventually exceeds that which can be supplied by aerobic metabolism. Our muscles simply need more reactions to support the energy demand. Therefore, anaerobic contribution to metabolism increases. When this happens, we refer to this change in metabolism as a metabolic threshold. This metabolic threshold represents the exercise intensity where we start to produce those waste products of anaerobic metabolism that can eventually lead to fatigue. You see this all the time when watching endurance Olympic events, such as a long distance running race. The athletes run at a pace that hovers around their metabolic threshold, and they can only afford to run faster than this pace near the end of the race. If they increase their pace too early in the race, then they fatigue too early and need to slow down to below their metabolic threshold to recover from the fatigue inducing waste products. This would result in poor performance.

    So how do these terms relate to you? Well, it depends on your circumstance and goals. Most of us are non-competitive or non-elite active individuals, who just want to exercise to gain health benefits, feel good and possibly lose weight. Aerobic exercise conditions enable you to exercise for long periods of time, potentially benefiting from the sustained energy expenditure (i.e., calories burned). Aerobic exercise tends to be less stressful to muscles, joints, and your heart, which may be important for individuals with arthritis, heart disease, or high blood pressure. However, to more rapidly improve your exercise capacities, tolerance, and performance, some anaerobic exercise training is a necessity. Therefore, performing anaerobic exercise is typically more important for competitive athletes.

    When starting a training program, most trainers like to have their clients/athletes start with lower intensity exercise (i.e., aerobic exercise). However, a high reliance on anaerobic metabolism is unavoidable for some types of exercise or activities. For instance, lifting weights is anaerobic. That is why muscles fatigue so rapidly with this type of training. Other types of activities, such as walking up stairs, can also be anaerobic - especially if you are unfit or climb too fast.

    Fortunately, we do not need sophisticated equipment to detect when we transition from aerobic to anaerobic exercise. As we approach and pass our metabolic threshold intensity, we start to breath harder, we are forced to really concentration on the exercise/activity, and exercise simply becomes uncomfortable. However, if you simply love gadgets, you can use a heart rate monitor to record the heart rate at which you sense these symptoms of developing over-exertion. You then know that heart rates below this value occur when you're in your aerobic zone, and heart rates above this value reflect an increasing anaerobic contribution to your exercise bout.
    When you first start exercising your metabolic threshold is quite low. If you train properly you can increase the level of your metabolic threshold. In other words the stronger your heart gets aerobicly the more volume of blood and therefore oxygen it supplys to your body with fewer heartbeats. If possible get yourself O2(that's what they call it in my gym) tested. They do it at my gym and it costs around $100. It is a test on the treadmill. You have a mask on that tracks the components in your breathe and will monitor your progress and let you know where your metabolic threshold occurs. Then a software program create an aerobic training program for you (usually a 5 day a week program) where you can train effective just under your metabolic threshold and actually move it up. You can monitor more accurately with a heart rate monitor exactly what your heart rate is and stay in the zones you need to be. This entire process is to take the guess work out and to train smarter not harder.

    I am not a runner or jogger and did most of my O2 training walking on the Tmill by changing the height of the tmill. In fact that is what my program suggested. Sometimes I adjusted the height up or down to increase the intensity of the walk and using my heart rate monitor to make sure I was in the correct zone.

    I have also gotten my basic metabolic rate (BMR) done at my gym so I know exactly how many calories I need to provide my body if it was at complete rest for the day. The majority of people do overestimate how many calories they really need in a day. You also don't want to go into starvation mode and slow your weight loss progress.

    While getting a personal trainer is a great idea. I know they can be expensive. Get one for say a series of 8 or 10 sessions. Tell them exactly what you want to accomplish. One of the most important things a trainer can do is show you how to use the machines in the gym. I can't believe how many times I have seen a 5' tall person use equipment a 6' tall person just used without resetting for their arm and leg length.

    If a personal trainer is too expensive try to get one to train you and an friend and you can split the costs.

    At my gym they have a third alternative where they have classes limited to 8 people that meet 3 times a week for say 12 wks that do a group class usually involving the treadmill and circuit training. I know one co-worker who did this and lost 20 or was it 30lbs.

    Hope all this info helps.
    Last edited by Bearcata; 11-24-2009 at 11:45 AM.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

  8. #118
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    OSG--Hi.

    A really easy way to tell when you've switched to the anaerobic phase is when you start to breath hard.

    When I bike my usual 30-40 miles the first 20 miles are pretty easy--I'm workig but it's not too much of an effort.


    The last ten miles get to be hard work and I start to breath noisily and I HAVE to think about what I am doing because my body is really working overtime on trying to get enough oxygen to my muscles.


    If you pay attention to your body as you exercise/work out you can usually tell what's goin' on.

    As a matter of fact another one of the great side effects of regular exercise/workouts is that you get a much greater understanding of and appreciation for your body and how it works for you.



    BTW--I wouldn't worry too much about aerobic versus anaerobic--just get the heart rate up into that 60-70% of Maximum Heart Rate for 10-15 minutes and you'll be doing your circulatory system and your whole body a great favor.

    The only people who really need to think much about aerobi cversus anaerobic are serious athletes who are working at cutting seconds or portions of seconds off their times.

    For most people it isn't really these minute details that are important--it is getting up off the couch and exercising regularly--at leat 30 minutes 4-5 times per week--that make the difference between being and staying healthy versus being a cardiovascular accident just waiting to happen.

    The kind of details involved in all these minute calculations can scare off many people.

    That Nike ad really has it right--Just do it! really works well.
    Last edited by Wind Dancer; 11-24-2009 at 12:46 PM.

  9. #119
    chavy chaf chaf Asteroids Champion, Bejeweled 2 Champion, GalaGalaGa Champion, Doyu Gems Champion, Alu`s Revenge Champion, Beat The Meter Champion, BejeweledŽ 2 Action Champion, Little Protectors Champion spockwhat's Avatar
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    Great info, Bearcata.

    OneSillyGirl, be sure to let us know how it goes with the Personal Trainer...

  10. #120
    Read The Clue Bearcata's Avatar
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    Re: Weight Loss, Diet, and Exercise Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Wind Dancer;3756337;
    OSG--Hi.

    A really easy way to tell when you've switched to the anaerobic phase is when you start to breath hard.

    When I bike my usual 30-40 miles the first 20 miles are pretty easy--I'm workig but it's not too much of an effort.


    The last ten miles get to be hard work and I start to breath noisily and I HAVE to think about what I am doing because my body is really working overtime on trying to get enough oxygen to my muscles.


    If you pay attention to your body as you exercise/work out you can usually tell what's goin' on.

    As a matter of fact another one of the great side effects of regular exercise/workouts is that you get a much greater understanding of and appreciation for your body and how it works for you.



    BTW--I wouldn't worry too much about aerobic versus anaerobic--just get the heart rate up into that 60-70% of Maximum Heart Rate for 10-15 minutes and you'll be doing your circulatory system and your whole body a great favor.

    The only people who really need to think much about aerobi cversus anaerobic are serious athletes who are working at cutting seconds or portions of seconds off their times.

    For most people it isn't really these minute details that are important--it is getting up off the couch and exercising regularly--at leat 30 minutes 4-5 times per week--that make the difference between being and staying healthy versus being a cardiovascular accident just waiting to happen.

    The kind of details involved in all these minute calculations can scare off many people.

    That Nike ad really has it right--Just do it! really works well.
    That is so not ture. It is better to be informed and to know how to work out effectively so you get the results you want instead of wondering why you can't drop that last pesky 10lbs or why can't you run your mile faster. It is better to work out smarter not harder.
    "When life gives you lemons, squirt lemon juice in your enemy's eyes."

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