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Thread: They haven't been Amish for quite some time

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    They haven't been Amish for quite some time

    First I just wanted to thank Zaius for the wonderful recap. I have been following the show and was very bummed that I missed the last episode.

    Second, I wanted to let everyone know that the Amish kids in the show have not been with the Amish for a long time. I have heard about 5 years or so.

    The way I know this is because my sister has converted to the Amish about 5 years ago. The Amish are all pretty tight and know eachother from the different communities across the country. Several people in my sister's community know Miriam and said that she has not been with the Amish for atleast 5 years and neither have any of the other ones (Mose I am not sure about).

    This made so much more sense to me, as I was confused on how the girls already had short, dyed hair when they first took off their Amish clothes. Also, if you were raised in a world that taught you to be modest and cover your body from head to toe, how would you feel so comfortable going on national television in a bikini? I know for myself, I am uncomfortable putting on a bikini just after our Midwestern winters.

    Also, the fact that they were all in their early twenties and Rumspringa takes place when they turn 16...made no sense to me.

    And...if you saw the episode where they milk the cows...Ruth makes a statement "Look I still remember how to do it!" Well, if she just came from the Amish, why would she have forgotten?

    Anyhow, I beleive that is why none of them actually said whether or not they were going back to the Amish. They wouldn't lie, and say "yes" and maybe they were afraid it would look too bad if they all said "no".

    However, any of the communities that I have met would never be okay with their children doing a tv show. But I do feel that they represented themselves well enough for the "non-amish" viewers to respect them and I am glad I didn't see any drunkeness and making out taking place.

    Overall, I can say that the Amish that I have come in contact with are the most loving, respectful, caring, Godly, non-judmental and accepting people I have ever met.

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    FORT Regular Flash-57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amish sister
    Overall, I can say that the Amish that I have come in contact with are the most loving, respectful, caring, Godly, non-judmental and accepting people I have ever met.
    Except, as I understand it, they shun family members who decide that the religion is not right for them. That's a fairly judgmental and non-caring attitude if you ask me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by amish sister
    The way I know this is because my sister has converted to the Amish about 5 years ago.
    Since it is my understanding that Amish shun those of their family that aren't Amish, how does this apply in your case? I'm assuming, of course, that you yourself are not Amish, and that neither you nor your sister were born into the Amish community. I realize this is rather personal, so I understand if you don't wish to discuss it, but I am quite curious. I find the idea of "English" converting to Amish ways an even more intriguing topic than Amish who choose to leave the Amish lifestyle.

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    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Hi, Olivia!
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    Let me be the first to say
    , amish sister!

    I thoroughly enjoyed your post and especially appreciated the special insights you brought to the discussion.

    While I believe that not all reality based television (or "unscripted programming") is 100 percent on the level but rather the final product of some selective editing, something bothered me about the behavior of most of the "Amish" participants on this show. I'm glad you pointed them out.

    You expressed your opinions well; I hope you'll stay a while and participate in the other forums.

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    FORT Fogey candor's Avatar
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    Ahhhh. Now it makes sense.
    The city kids did not stay with a real Amish family when they went back, which made me think the producers couldn't find a single family that would allow them in. And if that were the case, these Amish kids, given their age and dress were certainly more removed from their past than it first seemed.
    This kind of makes the whole premise a bit misleading.
    I'm curious about Ruth, though. Does this mean her boyfriend is also out of the Amish community? If not, how would they "date"?
    "If there are no dogs in heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

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    Staying Afloat speedbump's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by candor
    I'm curious about Ruth, though. Does this mean her boyfriend is also out of the Amish community? If not, how would they "date"?
    I think Ruth said her boyfriend was doing the Rumspringa thing as well.
    You got to cry without weeping. Talk without speaking. Scream without raising your voice.- U2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash-57
    Except, as I understand it, they shun family members who decide that the religion is not right for them. That's a fairly judgmental and non-caring attitude if you ask me.
    Actually, most Amish communities do not shun you if you leave after rumspringa without joining the church. However, if you come back, join the church, and then leave you will be shunned. Someone who just decides that the community is not where they are called is still allowed to have contact with the community.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash-57
    Except, as I understand it, they shun family members who decide that the religion is not right for them. That's a fairly judgmental and non-caring attitude if you ask me.
    One thing everyone needs to understand is that you can not generalize the Amish. You can't generalize any religion for that matter....Catholic, Jewish, Buddhist etc....are not all exactly the same within. I can only speak of the Amish that I know and that my sister has educated me on.

    Any of the communities that I have been around do not actually participate in Rumspringa. They do not feel it is necessary to allow their teens to run around wild before they get baptized and honestly, the teens do not wish to. They are raised doing what they do for Jesus Christ and by the Bible...and do not wish to live any other way. They are the happiest, most respectful and peaceful teens I have ever met. Now don't get me wrong, they are all human and some children may grow up and wish to leave, but the percentage is very very low.

    Also, any of the communities that I have met and know people in, do not shun anyone. They pray for those that have left, in hopes that they will find the "peace" and come back. They also pray diligently for those who have not joined yet. (Like my sister for me ) They only want the best for everyone!

    For the families that do shun, you need to understand that the Amish live the way they do to distance themselves from the world and the worldly things that come with it. This is how they keep themselves focused and pure. If someone leaves the church, then they have joined the world. It's not being judgemental, it is simply not putting yourself around situations that would not be beneficial to you. As I said before though, I have not met any families that practice shunning or Rumspringa and can not speak for them, this is just what I have learned.

  9. #9
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    English & Amish

    Quote Originally Posted by galliard
    Since it is my understanding that Amish shun those of their family that aren't Amish, how does this apply in your case? I'm assuming, of course, that you yourself are not Amish, and that neither you nor your sister were born into the Amish community. I realize this is rather personal, so I understand if you don't wish to discuss it, but I am quite curious. I find the idea of "English" converting to Amish ways an even more intriguing topic than Amish who choose to leave the Amish lifestyle.
    My sister's church and associated communities are very open to "English" people coming to visit their Amish families. In fact if they know someone is coming to visit, they all jump at the chance to have them over for dinner! When the English friends and family visit however, out of respect you should always dress modestly and be considerate of not swearing, smoking, drinking alcohol...things like that. When I visit my sister's house, I will wear my normal clothes (jeans) and makeup..but if she has Amish company coming over and/or I am going to attend their church, I am always very plain and modest - hair pulled back, no makeup, long baggy dress to ankles.

    You would be VERY surprised to hear how many Amish are converted from English.

    My sister was the first to convert- to make a long story short...she was married and had 3 children. She was experiencing some major problems in the marriage and hit rock bottom...to the point she was suicidal...which is completely not my sister. Because we were always raised Catholic, she was led to the Bible for help. Reading the Bible brought her closer to God and he completely saved her. She started feeling that it's right to take the Bible more literaly and found herself understanding the plain people's lifestyle (plain people as in Mennonite etc...). She met a guy online through a forum of plain people and he said she would be a perfect fit for an Amish community that he knew of. He introduced them, and she moved there a few years later, and then joined the church. Now the interesting part is that my bro-in-law was not Amish. But felt this lifestyle was best for his children and basically just let my sister do what she wanted. 5 years later, their marriage is wonderful now and my bro-in-law is in the process of joining the church too.

    My actual brother has also decided to move to my sister's in an effort to get his life back together and now, 2 years later, is joining the church too. (My brother was a huge partier, did drugs, stole, slept around....not someone you would think would become Amish). He is happier than he has ever been in his life. They all are...and I love being around the communities too. There is nothing you can compare it to out in the "world".

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    Very interesting! Thanks for sharing!

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