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Thread: What's with the accents??

  1. #31
    FORT Fogey maersk's Avatar
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    well

    90-95% of amish in michigan speak dutch/are of dutch ancestry, a fact not much known outside of the state.

  2. #32
    tkd
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    [QUOTE=Cairon]
    When the Amish kids spoke Pensylvania Dutch I instantly recognized it as being closer to German than Dutch.

    I shouldn't be so surprised, after all, languages evolve with time. English, belonging to the Indo-European linguistic family, is heavily influenced by Danish, German, Dutch and Frisian. It all dates back to 449 AD... god... I'm not going to finish this story...

    I really have to correct you on this one (and I am a linguist specializing in Germanic languages, so I know what I am talking about). You are right that English, German, Dutch, Frisian and Danish are Indo-European. So are Hittite and Sanskrit, for that matter, so that is not the issue. English, German, Dutch, Frisian, and Pennsylvania Dutch are all West Germanic languages (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Icelandic, and Faroese are North Germanic). But whether Pennsylvania Dutch is closer to Dutch or German depends on the region. Some varieties of Pennsylvania Dutch are closest to Alemmanic (Swiss German), while others are closer to Frisian. It all depends where the particular community originally emigrated from. And linguists classify Pennsylvania Dutch as a creole (mix of two languages), because it has been so heavily influenced by English, both in lexical items and in syntactic structure.

  3. #33
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    Our language is very heavily influenced by English-yes.And its origin is from Germany and Switzerland although it has changed so much that its become its own language.I spent some time in Germany this summer and my friends tell me out language still has a lot of really old German words that they don't even use anymore.I find it fascinating.Like our language can tell us a story about our history.I'm learning real German as soon as I finish Spanish.(I'm in love with languages)
    AND about Randy-hes a friend of mine and hes absolutely not gay.I haven't watched any of the show since I'm not in the country but sounds to me like hes just not trying to hog all the attention.Hes a very nice guy.His accent is a little different cause of the area he lives in.They speak Pennsylvania dutch with that accent too.

  4. #34
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    I am of German descent. My family says that we are Pennsylvania Dutch, and we are Lutherans, Methodists, Disciples of Christ, and Baptist. Still, we are German. We became "Pennsylvania Dutch" during World War II because my German relatives had heard rumors that the government was going to inter Germans in concentration camps like the Japanese were, so they called themselves "Dutch" to protect themselves. I don't think Pennsylvania Dutch is a bonified language anyway. The Amish kids accents were thick with German and local dialectic. Hey, have you ever heard someone from Georgia or Alabama speak. I love their accents. Massachusetts has a very distinct accent. So, there is no big deal about accent. It just defined them even more.

  5. #35
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    The accents are great. I like the measured tones Mose uses. Dutch in this sense is a "corrupted" version of the word Deutsch, but you must remember these people have a 300 year history within North America and their homelands in Europe have undergone a great deal of change, our terms today do not equate with the same terms in their own history, what this means is that the term Dutch is a 300 year old derived word meaning German in the widest sense (including High and Low German and Netherlandic). I have seen written verions of their language, though I presume they do not regularly write in this dialect/language. For anyone interested in etymology Deutsch and Dutch are related to the word TEUTonic, and shows up in the name of the Gothic ruler of Rome THEODeric: the ultimate meaning of this root is simply PEOPLE, which is a common base for historical references and names of races/tribes/clans/groups.

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