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Thread: Stupid question ...

  1. #1
    FORT Fan dietcokegirl's Avatar
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    Stupid question ...

    Okay, I don't want to sound dumb .. but can you just decide to become amish? It didn't seem like the sort of thing that you could just choose to be.. it seemed sorta like due to the culture and such, you had to be sort of born into it .. I don't know.

    Does anyone know if there is any research on this? I'm really rather interested in the whole amish thing, I take the greyhound bus all the time, when I go home to see my parents, and I always see the amish on the bus, and I always want to talk to them / ask them what their life is like, but I imagine they'd think my questions were rude ..

    Sorry, hope this isn't out of line.

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    Becoming Amish

    Hi,

    I have wondered myself if it is possible to become Amish. I have been interested in Amish culture for a long time. Their culture isn't as idyllic as we would like to think it is but I believe it would be wonderful to simplify life and leave the city. What has technology brought us? People aren't happy with the things they have and we have all become very impersonal. Who talks to their neighbors anymore? From the research I have done as common as it is for someone to leave the Amish order it is rare for an Englisher to become Amish. I would think you would need an Amish family as a sponser for one. Because our culture and way of life is so different from theirs you would have to learn all of the skills necessary to become a productive member of Amish society. Before even learning how to cook, clean, sew and manage a household (as I assume Amish women do) you would have to see if you are compatiable with the religious beliefs. A large portion of Amish life is based on their faith. You couldn't just try to become Amish without believing in their faith. Next time you have the oppertunity to speak with an Amish person... ask. You'll never know if it's possible without talking to someone who is already living that sort of life.

    God Bless,

    RhyannonTrinity
    Like the Phoenix... we can all be reborn from the ashes

  3. #3
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    From http://www.shawcreekgeneralstore.com/amish_faq.htm

    Can an outsider become Amish?
    While it is not uncommon for a person born into the Amish faith to leave that church and culture for a more liberal lifestyle, it is quite unusual — but not impossible — for an “Englishman” to give up modern accoutrements for the extreme discipline of the Old Order Amish. Such a conversion would include formal instruction in Amish beliefs and language as well as baptism — not to mention significant lifestyle changes. You would probably enjoy reading about Donald Beam — an Englishman who did just that — in “The Amish of Holmes County.”

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    FORT Fogey
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    Thanks for the information, John. Sounds like an interesting book... guess I'll have to add it to my stack of seven "must reads".

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    FORT Fogey Lil Bit's Avatar
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    I think it would be almost impossible to "become" Amish. There are a lot of Amish families here where I live. In my opinion the lifestyle is very harsh. People may romanticize it some because of it's simplicity but in reality they live really hard lives. Especially hard for the women. As a free speaking, liberated woman, I can't even imagine living the life that those women do. Just the clothing restrictions alone would kill me. We raise chickens every year and take them to the Amish to be butchered. Three women butchered 56 chickens and had them finished by 4 in the afternoon. AND they only charge 70 cents a piece! Now, to any of you out there who have ever butchered and plucked a chicken..... would YOU do it for 70 cents???? Those people know a thing or two about hard work. I think it would be pretty hard for "city folk" to adapt.

    I've lived around Amish all my life and until this show came out, I'd never heard of such a thing as the young people leaving for the city to decide what way of life they want. (I know it has a name, but can't think of it) The Amish around here don't do that. I know of people who have left the order and they are shunned.
    When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down "Happy." They told me I didn't understand the assignment. I told them they didn't understand life. - John Lennon

  6. #6
    FORT Fogey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lil Bit
    I think it would be almost impossible to "become" Amish. There are a lot of Amish families here where I live. In my opinion the lifestyle is very harsh. People may romanticize it some because of it's simplicity but in reality they live really hard lives. Especially hard for the women. As a free speaking, liberated woman, I can't even imagine living the life that those women do. Just the clothing restrictions alone would kill me. We raise chickens every year and take them to the Amish to be butchered. Three women butchered 56 chickens and had them finished by 4 in the afternoon. AND they only charge 70 cents a piece! Now, to any of you out there who have ever butchered and plucked a chicken..... would YOU do it for 70 cents???? Those people know a thing or two about hard work. I think it would be pretty hard for "city folk" to adapt.
    The hard work wouldn't bother me and I admire and respect the fact that they are unaffected by commercialism and materialism... but living as though I was not equal to a man? Impossible. :phhht I can't even imagine my only creative outlets being quilting or cooking. And as a mother, I would want my children to be educated, and to have the right to read all the best literature.

    Just shy of $40 for all that work.

  7. #7
    Under Investigation Tirlittan's Avatar
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    How about healthcare? Are they allowed to go use modern facilities and technology if they face an emergency which could not be handled in their own community? I would expect that they have doctors amongst them, but what about more serious diseases, injuries etc. How are they handled and are there differences in this respect between different Amish groups?
    ps. This is just my opinion in the matter.

  8. #8
    FORT Fogey Glitternerfball's Avatar
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    I suspect there are differences among some of the groups. And I also wonder aobut the healthcare, becasue didn't Ruth say that her Cousin/namesake died at age three or something and was a 'special need' child? That's why she wanted to be a nurse, right?

    I always thought that modernism was out, but Mose makes mechanical toys like the tractor.

  9. #9
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    If you click on the link I provided above, it also answers questions regarding healthcare and some other info you might be curious about.

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