+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 74 FirstFirst 123456789101112131454 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 740

Thread: A.I. Media Articles

  1. #31
    FORT Fogey Cleocatra's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Catmandu
    Posts
    5,590
    hahahahaha echo please say it ain't so!

    Good lord, I guess the AI producers know more than we do about their target audience, people who kick puppies and steal wheel chairs from old people then laugh about it with their friends

    I give up, I really thought that people would rather see ALL of the singers who make it through to Hollywood and then fill in the spaces with some of the funny, quirky misfits.
    At this point they have done the opposite, fill the show with freaks and whatever time is left over fill in with a couple of the ones who were good enough to make it through

    Oh well, soon enough this portion is over with and we are down to the "meat & potatoes"

  2. #32
    FORT Fogey razorbacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    9,665
    Here is what the "crack baby" girl said:

    She has big plans for her future, too. She plans to release an R&B album on Feb. 7

    Now ain't that against the rules? Someone enlighten me please. I thought these folks could audition & go to Hollywood only if they didn't have a recording contract. Maybe she is self produced & releasing this on her own?

  3. #33
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755
    Quote Originally Posted by razorbacker;2209224;
    Here is what the "crack baby" girl said:

    She has big plans for her future, too. She plans to release an R&B album on Feb. 7

    Now ain't that against the rules? Someone enlighten me please. I thought these folks could audition & go to Hollywood only if they didn't have a recording contract. Maybe she is self produced & releasing this on her own?
    That's how I took it razor....or it could mean she didn't make it any further than the Hollywood round in the competition so she's going to capitalize on her TV time and release it?
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  4. #34
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    5,197
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleocatra;2209181;
    hahahahaha echo please say it ain't so!

    Good lord, I guess the AI producers know more than we do about their target audience, people who kick puppies and steal wheel chairs from old people then laugh about it with their friends

    I give up, I really thought that people would rather see ALL of the singers who make it through to Hollywood and then fill in the spaces with some of the funny, quirky misfits.
    At this point they have done the opposite, fill the show with freaks and whatever time is left over fill in with a couple of the ones who were good enough to make it through

    Oh well, soon enough this portion is over with and we are down to the "meat & potatoes"
    Perfectly said.

    I wouldn't have watched either episode had I known this was the kind of inhumane trash I was going to get. It's old, and it's unnecessrily cruel.

  5. #35
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755
    One local man stung; another has a ball

    By Susan Kelleher and Brian Alexander
    Seattle Times staff reporter

    Should Jonathan Jayne get another chance to sing before 36 million people on national television, don't be surprised if he selects "Don't Cry for Me Argentina."

    A day after "American Idol" judge Simon Cowell dismissed Jayne's performance and commented on his girth, the Renton native was reveling in his newfound fame and waxing philosophical about the price he was willing to pay for it.

    "I think it was absolutely wonderful," Jayne, 21, said Thursday from his home, where he spent the day fielding phone calls from reporters. "I was just having a blast, and this is what you get for having a blast."

    "This" is a spate of TV columnists, personalities and bloggers decrying the cruelty meted out by "Idol" judges, who snickered and snorted their way through critiques on contestant's clothing, weight, height and, in the case of one Bothell man, his eyes.

    The smarmy barbs have become a typical, even anticipated part of the show. But viewers apparently had a soft spot for Jayne and Kenneth Briggs, the 23-year-old Bothell man whose eyes Cowell compared to a primate's. Both young men seemed genuine, earnest and vulnerable, prompting viewers to lash out against their treatment.

    "It's one thing to make fun of the voice teacher who is obviously in the wrong profession, but another to pick on someone's physical features in front of millions of people," one viewer wrote on Entertainment Weekly's Web site.

    Briggs, who said he usually goes by the name Michael Swale, said Thursday he is in shock from all the backlash after Cowell's comments aired Wednesday night.

    By Thursday morning, national TV shows were talking about Cowell's remarks, and Briggs' cellphone filled up with messages.

    "I knew he would be cruel about my singing, but I didn't know he would be cruel about my personality and cruel about my appearance," Briggs said. "To me, it just seems like Simon could learn some manners."

    Despite the comments, Briggs feels like he came away with his dignity.
    advertising

    "I enjoyed doing it. Would I change a thing and go back and not do it? No, I would do it again," he said.

    Jayne said he gave it his all after producers selected him out of thousands of potential contestants during a round of auditions in Seattle last October, telling him he was "different and he was singing pretty good." The judges — Cowell, Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson — complimented his personality, but Cowell sarcastically referred to his waistline and asked if he was wearing the portly Jackson's pants.

    After the auditions, Cowell pronounced the Seattle contestants "the worst bunch of miserable singers" he'd ever seen.

    Jayne, who watched the show with his mother, seemed mystified by the backlash. Although viewers speculated about his disabilities, he said he will talk only about his abilities. And if people want to throw a pity party for him, he said, they'll have to do it without him: He's too busy talking to reporters and handing out the phone number for his new agent.

    On Thursday night, Jayne planned to reprise his performance of "God Bless America" for a social club he belongs to.

    Briggs and Jayne flew down to Los Angeles today. They'll appear tonight on "The Jimmy Kimmel Live" show. Listeners of a West Palm Beach radio station offered donations to fly out the two contestants for a Florida vacation, including a singing appearance at an upcoming concert.

    "I told my listeners that something really disturbed me last night while watching 'American Idol.' And they all knew what I was talking about, and the phones were ringing. And they were saying we should have them here so they could sing and we could just applaud and have a party for them," said Brant Hanson, morning host for 88.1 WAY-FM.

    For Jayne, the barbs come with the difficult career path he's chosen, one that he hopes will lead to a DJ job or a gig as a talk-show host.

    "If you're going to make it in TV, the first time you're going to fail, the second time you're going to fail, the third time you're still going to fail. The fourth time you might get somewhere, the fifth time you might get something really good, and the sixth time you're going to be a star."

    He also observed that the negativity "doesn't make me look bad. It does make Simon, Paula and Randy look bad."

    Link Here
    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
    Great attitude! Good for them! Let them enjoy their "fame time". I'm not really a fan of Jimmy Kimmel so I missed them on his show tonight...did anyone else see them?
    Last edited by bbnbama; 01-20-2007 at 03:07 AM. Reason: Oops...forgot to post link...
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  6. #36
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755
    Angry over ‘Idol’ portrayal
    Published Friday, January 19, 2007

    DULUTH - A former Superior, Wis., man and his mother are steamed at “American Idol” for how his third-round performance was portrayed in Wednesday night’s broadcast.

    Steven Thoen, 28, said the Fox television show’s producers were disrespectful and unfair to him. His mother, June Lorimor of Superior, said that the show took advantage of Thoen’s mild mental retardation and made him a laughingstock.

    Thoen’s rendition of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” was resoundingly panned by the show’s panel of judges and next-day critics.

    USA Today called it a “grisly, tuneless falsetto” and named it as one of the night’s worst performances. Thoen and tart-tongued judge Simon Cowell also had a tiff when Cowell disparaged Thoen’s performance. It was strictly a verbal altercation.

    Lorimor said her son never should have made it as far as he did on the show.

    “You could tell by looking at him there is something wrong with the kid,” she said. “ ‘American Idol’ ought to have their butts sued. How dare they.”

    She also contends Thoen was goaded into his confrontation with Cowell by the show’s producers.

    “The producers told him Simon was going to be really rough on him and don’t take it,” Lorimor said. “So he did as he was flippin’ told.”

    The News Tribune attempted to get an official comment from Fox executives Thursday. A Fox spokeswoman called back and promised a news release, but it had not been received by the time the News Tribune went to press.

    Thoen would not discuss whether he has a disability and denied that the producers told him to tussle with Cowell.

    “I don’t stage anything,” Thoen said. “I’m all real. I come straight at you.”

    Thoen, who moved to Seattle after a three-year stint in the Navy, said his performance was affected by his feeling ill.

    “I was under the weather but I wasn’t going to pull out, so I said, ‘Screw it. I’m just going to have fun,’ ” Thoen said.

    Still, Thoen said his illness made it more difficult to sing. He said “Bohemian Rhapsody” was “out of his range” and he had difficulty hitting the song’s high notes.

    “Given the circumstances, I did the best I could,” he said.

    Thoen said “American Idol” producers were rude to him and his adopted city.

    “I am so disappointed at how low they go to get ratings. They will go so low to humiliate people,” he said. “I don’t like the way ‘American Idol’ portrayed me. I was disrespected.”

    He said the show’s organizers should “do themselves a favor and do Seattle a favor. Don’t come back.”

    Seattle and Minneapolis were two of seven cities where auditions took place last summer.

    Thoen grew up in Superior and went to Superior Senior High School, where he said he was in the choir and on the football team.

    Lorimor didn’t see her son’s performance — she was watching “Medium” — but got comments from friends and family. She thinks her son may have embarrassed himself in front of millions of people.

    “I had phone calls until midnight,” she said. “I finally had to shut the phone off.”

    Thoen had called her with the news he had made it through the show’s first two auditions.

    The judges — Cowell, Randy Jackson and Paula Abdul — laughed throughout Thoen’s Wednesday performance.

    This is the sixth year of the popular reality show.

    An estimated 36.9 million people watched the “American Idol” two-hour special on Fox on Wednesday night, down slightly from the 37.3 million who tuned in for the program’s two-hour season premiere on Tuesday night, according to Nielsen Media Research.

    They were the two biggest nights of prime-time entertainment on Fox since it came onto the air almost two decades ago.

    The audience for what host Ryan Seacrest dubbed “the weirdest turnout in history” on Wednesday was 17 percent bigger than the corresponding night a year ago, Nielsen said.



    Red's Link

    Ok...so reading this makes me feel even sorrier for him....his mom wasn't even watching her son?????????? WTH is up with that????
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  7. #37
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755
    Quote Originally Posted by bbnbama
    she'll return to Los Angeles on Feb. 14 for the semifinals.
    I hate to quote myself but in the article I had posted upthread about Denise (the crack baby) I had completely overlooked this one statement. I'm going to put in spoiler tags since there is that potential..........

    Click to see Spoiler:
    By returning February 14th for the semi-finals...does that mean she's made it through everything???? How would she know she would need to be back in LA on February 14th or am I just reading too much into this????
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  8. #38
    Big Electric Cat jasmar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,802
    I haven't seen this one posted yet:

    As new season begins, American Idol' judges called guilty of cruelty to contestants

    NEW YORK (AP) - "Even the juggling was pathetic." With that cutting blow, Simon Cowell ended Jason Anderson's moment in the spotlight. Anderson, all of 16, stormed out of his "American Idol" audition into his family's arms, obscenities flowing as freely as the tears.

    High school can be vicious enough. But not as nasty as Cowell, who also told the would-be singer/juggler that he "summed up Minneapolis, mate - useless."

    The "American Idol" juggernaut has become ever more popular in this, its sixth season. But it sure seems meaner, too. At least that's the talk this week as the judges - not just the acerbic Cowell, but the usually genial Randy Jackson and the kind but loopy Paula Abdul - up the torture quotient, taking train-wreck TV viewing to a whole new level.

    Young or old, pretty or ugly, male or female: No category of contestant has been spared in this week's audition coverage. The judges have even taken swipes at contestants behind their backs, making snide remarks after the singers have left. "Obnoxious," Cowell sniffed of one who'd just been voted into the next round. "What a strange guy," Jackson said of another.

    And if you argue the contestants are asking for it by merely deciding to appear, consider the supportive boss of Dayna Dooley, who flew her and her sister to Minneapolis from California, so strongly did he believe in her singing. After panning her performance, the panel repeatedly insinuated to Dooley that she was inappropriately involved with her boss. Then they called the nice man in, told him his employee was "terrible," and proceeded to make the same insinuation to him - while his wife sat just outside the room.

    "It just seems like they're being a lot meaner," says Jessica Rhode. She should know. After the 21-year-old makeup artist was given a thumbs-down by the panel, she collapsed to her knees and wept, begging the judges for some constructive advice. "It would take an hour," Cowell retorted. He told her to be happy: Now she could move on, knowing she'd never be a singer.

    "That was the worst thing, in my opinion," Rhode said in a telephone interview. "I expected at least one of them to say something nice. I was like, is this really necessary?"

    The cruelest moment undoubtedly came in Seattle, where a spirited young man named Kenneth Briggs, who liked to compare himself to Justin Timberlake, was told by Cowell: "You look a little odd ... you look like one of those creatures that live in the jungle, with those massive eyes ... a bush baby." Once he left, the three judges were shown cracking up hysterically at the "bush baby" remark.

    Their behavior brought a rebuke from the hosts of ABC's "The View." "The whole thing, it's terribly sad to me," said moderator Rosie O'Donnell.

    Even the doors were mean. In a malfunction that seemed expressly designed to deepen the humiliation, one side of the double doors to the Minneapolis tryout room was locked or jammed. That meant Cowell got to smirk or roll his eyes every time a poor soul - Rhode was one of them - knocked into the wrong one during a hasty exit.

    At least Stephen Horst managed to pick the right door.

    "That's what my sister told me after the show," Horst says. It was the best thing she could think of, after the pummeling the 28-year old vocal coach took from Jackson.

    Horst, of New York City, is a positive thinker if there ever was one. "I believe everything happens for a reason," he says. "I had a dream, and I went after it. Life is short, and you have to enjoy every sandwich."

    So Horst, on his own dime, traveled to Minneapolis and stayed at a hotel during the audition process. He chose to sing Aerosmith's "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing." Maybe it was the song choice, or the singing itself, which veered into a sudden falsetto, or the fact that he was a vocal coach. Jackson went on a rampage.

    "I thought it was awful," he said. "You shouldn't be a vocal teacher. I wouldn't take vocal lessons from you, I wouldn't tell anybody to take vocal lessons from you." Cowell feigned indignation. "Are you going to take that, Stephen?" he baited Horst.

    "I was stunned," Horst said. "Randy just didn't like me." He's moving ahead with his music career, and doesn't plan to watch the Fox show anymore. "I need to create a new past," he says.

    That's the kind of positive thinking that has helped Paris Bennett in her career. Bennett, unlike most of those at this week's auditions, was an "American Idol" success story, coming in fifth last year and eventually earning a record deal.

    Yet she, too, endured her share of negative comments. Cowell once told her that her speaking voice reminded him of Minnie Mouse. She was 17 at the time.

    "You can let it knock you down, or you can take it as constructive criticism," Bennett said in a telephone interview. She said her grandmother and her mother, both singers, had taught her to look at the positive, not the negative.

    "It all just depends on how you take it," she said. She obviously took it well. In March, her debut album comes out. The first single, "Ordinary Love," was released this week.

    http://www.katu.com/news/entertainment/5265746.html
    Token Christian.

    If truth is relative, how do you know?

  9. #39
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In my own little world where all things are Idol......
    Age
    48
    Posts
    10,755
    New York Times

    Showbiz Exporter Scores Goal

    By BILL CARTER
    Published: January 20, 2007

    PASADENA, Calif., Jan. 19 — Simon Fuller has achieved remarkable success in Britain as an entertainment executive and manager, chiefly in the recording industry. But clearly he has finally found the area of his true business acumen: export.

    In recent history, at least, it is hard to imagine anyone who has directed a more lucrative shift of British entertainment product to the American market than Mr. Fuller. Not only is he the man behind the transport of a British television show called “Pop Idol” to this country, where, as “American Idol,” it has become the show business phenomenon of the decade, but in the past month he has also engineered the transfer of David Beckham, the biggest athletic star in Britain, to a team in Los Angeles, with the intent of inspiring no less than a revolution of interest in the sport in the one big country where it so far has failed to flourish.

    That may seem a grandiose expectation, but who is going to doubt Mr. Fuller right now, with “American Idol” once again towering over American television and squashing its home-grown competition?

    Reached by telephone this week in the Brazilian region of Bahia, where he was vacationing, Mr. Fuller said it was difficult to determine what was the more impressive recent development for his export portfolio: the improbably awe-inspiring ratings for the new season of “Idol,” or the five-year deal, worth an estimated $250 million in salary and ancillary income, he landed for Mr. Beckham to join the Los Angeles Galaxy soccer team next season.

    On the one hand, he called this week’s “Idol” ratings results “utterly amazing and just ridiculous.” On the other hand, he declared himself “totally excited by this very audacious, entrepreneurial deal” for Mr. Beckham to finish his career by igniting an American passion for soccer.

    “Soccer is coming in the U.S.,” Mr. Fuller, 46, said. “You can smell it and feel it. It’s such a great sport, the dominant sport on the planet. And America is more than ever opening up to it.” Mr. Beckham, he predicted, will be the final spark the sport needs to captivate the United States.

    Sports writers, talk show hosts and fans of football, baseball and basketball are likely to dismiss this idea as a fantasy of soccer addicts who don’t get the idea that their game is too technical, too low on action and too low-scoring to ever stir the passions of sports enthusiasts here.

    But Mr. Fuller can simply counter the naysayers by pointing to the initial expectations for a show about people trying out for a singing competition. Memorably, Mr. Fuller, along with the show’s now-central celebrity, Simon Cowell, tried to tell American networks they had a hit series back in 2001, only to be dismissed by every network they visited as delusional Britons.

    Cut to this week and the first two installments of the sixth season of “American Idol” on Fox. Defying almost every law of programming, the show managed to eclipse even its own spectacular previous results, bringing in more people in its first two nights — about 37 million viewers each — than it ever had before.

    Peter Liguori, president of entertainment for the Fox network, said, “He’s changing American culture as we speak.” Referring to Mr. Fuller’s delivery of “Idol” and Beckham to the States, he added, “It’s a testament to his being smart and recognizing what’s in the zeitgeist.”

    Fox’s competitors could only shake their heads at the “Idol” season premiere, undone anew by the dashing of their hopes that this might be the year when the “Idol” phenomenon gave evidence of cracking.

    Mr. Fuller, who still maintains an executive producer credit on the show, said he had several theories as to why more people turned up to watch. First, he said, “you have to remember that America is a big country,” with plenty of people left to reach even when the biggest shows accumulate audiences.

    New viewers were drawn to the show this year, Mr. Fuller speculated, because events underscored how much impact the show had had on the music business.

    Among the events he cited were Grammy Award victories for Kelly Clarkson, the first “Idol” winner; soaring sales for new albums by other “Idol” contestants, including Carrie Underwood, who was a winner, and Chris Daughtry, who wasn’t; and the recent attention around the movie “Dreamgirls” and the critically praised performance by Jennifer Hudson, another “Idol” loser.

    “It doesn’t matter anymore if you win on the show,” Mr. Fuller said, noting that Mr. Daughtry’s new album has been outselling the album released by last year’s winner, Taylor Hicks. He predicted the album would soon pass Justin Timberlake’s as the nation’s top-seller, reaching at least three million in total sales.

    “You can finish fourth, like Chris did, or fifth or sixth (actually she finished seventh), like Jennifer did, and you can still make hits,” he said.

    Mr. Fuller pointed out that music fans from many genres were now being exposed to “Idol” performers. “You have Carrie, who is selling millions of albums to country fans,” he said. “You have Kelly, who is a mainstream pop artist. And you have Chris, who is the first real rock artist we’ve broken on the show. There there’s Jennifer, who’s winning every award for ‘Dreamgirls.’ I just think the music is getting out everywhere, and subliminally that has helped.”

    Mr. Fuller, the chief executive of 19 Entertainment, who is based in Britain, has management deals with the “Idol” performers through his company. He said he was “both a partner and a manager” to Mr. Beckham, whom he first met through his management of Mr. Beckham’s wife, Victoria, one of the Spice Girls, the singing group Mr. Fuller managed.

    Always a big fan of soccer, Mr. Fuller was involved in the deal in 1999 that took Mr. Beckham to Real Madrid, perhaps Europe’s most famous soccer team. He said that with Mr. Beckham’s Real deal ending, and the player now 31, it was time to contemplate the last big move of his athletic career.

    “We were looking for a move that would take David beyond soccer,” Mr. Fuller said. “David has been a phenomenal figure since he was 17. We knew he would still have value after soccer.”

    The options included a new big financial deal with Real Madrid, or perhaps an even bigger financial deal to move him to a team in Italy. “I just thought: Big deal — what’s the point?” Mr. Fuller said. But when the opportunity to make the move to the United States came up, enthusiasm was immediate for both Mr. Beckham and Mr. Fuller.

    “It was the challenge,” Mr. Fuller said. “Just imagine if he was part of something that made soccer truly a legitimate sport in America.” He said Mr. Beckham, who he said has always been smart about his career, got the idea at once.

    “If you are at the top of your profession,” Mr. Fuller said, “you can make the easy choice or you can say, ‘I’m going to go for it.’ ”
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  10. #40
    It Just Is. RubyRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    577
    Well, here's a different opinion:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16710551/site/newsweek/


    Simon, the Supportive?
    As 'American Idol' judges up the ante with bigger beat downs, a psychology professor says Cowell's cruel commentary might actually be a good thing.


    WEB EXCLUSIVE
    By Alexandra Gekas
    Newsweek
    Updated: 11:58 a.m. PT Jan 19, 2007
    Jan. 19, 2007 - During this week’s premiere of “American Idol,” viewers cringed as Simon, Randy and Paula doled out harsh criticisms to many of the less-than-worthy contestants. And as contestants cried, screamed and argued with the judges over their cruel remarks, viewers may have asked themselves if the insults had gone too far. Dr. Jennifer Crocker, a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan who focuses on self-esteem issues, says it may have seemed cruel, but at least it was honest. In an interview with NEWSWEEK, she says that in reality, Simon’s harsh advice may actually have been more compassionate than unconditionally positive reinforcement. Excerpts:

    NEWSWEEK: Many people are saying that this season’s premiere was crueler than previous seasons. What did you think about the first episode of Season 6?

    Dr. Jennifer Crocker: If I were in the contestants’ shoes I would have felt the criticisms were harsh. They didn’t feel very compassionate, but another interpretation you could make is that it really is a gift. Simon Cowell, more than Paula Abdul, is really trying to tell them the truth about their chances, if they are really trying to sing, and what they could do to improve. He is the only one who takes the risk and he gets in a lot of trouble for that. It’s very hard to hear it as constructive feedback that helps you to improve or to make constructive choices in life. It is really more valuable than the unconditional love Paula Abdul gives. She wants to be encouraging, but some of these people shouldn’t be encouraged to become pop idols.

    So do you think that Simon really wants to help the contestants do well?

    I think he probably feels compassion in many cases, but that doesn’t come through very much. But it must be incredibly tedious to hear audition after audition of people who have no business trying to have careers in singing. My overall sense is that Simon is more supportive of people because he is willing to tell them the truth.

    But could the harsh criticisms be permanently damaging to the contestants’ self-esteem?

    There’s some evidence that depression results when goals that are essential to people become blocked, but I think that most of the contestants probably rebound fairly quickly. In some ways I think the more insulting comments hurt less, because Simon’s obviously being a jerk, but when it’s just, “You can’t sing,” that would be harder. However, to say [there is] no major damage is too strong because there are probably a lot of people who come in with a lot of vulnerability. But by and large people are quite resilient and I really do think you can construe the criticism as a gift and as really very valuable for people even if it’s hard to hear.

    How badly could such negative feedback affect a contestant’s self-esteem?

    For sure it can hurt people’s self-esteem temporarily and the more invested they are, the more they’ve attached their self-worth to being a great singer, the more it’s going to hurt. The healthiest kind of resilience is people who say, “OK, this guy is helping me and giving me more useful information,” and you could see that with the better singers. He was trying to tell them what they had to do to get further on the show.

    Is it risky for “American Idol” to be so critical of people? Could contestants become violent or suicidal because of the comments from the judges?

    I think there’s probably a small risk of violence or suicide. There’s research that people who are narcissistic respond to insults by becoming aggressive so I think that’s a concern. Then I think there are other people who will really internalize it and become depressed, some of whom might have some preexisting vulnerability, so it’s not impossible they may become suicidal, but it would be unfair to say the criticism itself would cause that. The fact that some people really personalize it is not the fault of the show.

    Should parents support their children going on the show, whether or not they have the talent to win?

    It’s important for parents to be unconditionally loving—regardless of whether or not their kids are talented—but it’s important to be realistic. I don’t think it’s positive for parents to encourage their kids in the belief that they will be America’s next idol if there’s no chance. Telling your kid they’re great can create more vulnerability. Some people think kids can’t stand to hear anything negative so they only give them praise, but research shows that those are the kids who are the most vulnerable when they experience a setback.

    What makes “American Idol” so popular? Do we enjoy seeing other people fail?To some degree we like to see other people fail and feel superior to them. I think there is something interesting about the people who look like they have no talent, get up there and just don’t do well, but who really think they’re going to go all the way to the end of the show. At some level you identify with them and have compassion and wish them success when you get to know the characters a little bit because you start rooting for people and that is what gets viewers hooked on the show. But there is something sort of shocking and entertaining about the people who are so bad.

    Some of the worst contestants seem to really believe they can win. How can someone be so unrealistic about their own talent that they will go on national television even when they are terrible?

    Most of us think we’re better than average. There’s a strong human tendency to have positive illusions about ourselves so maybe that gets carried to an extreme. People tend to avoid direct feedback when they are heavily invested in those positive views so they’re able to sustain that illusion.

    Does the show ever seem exploitive to you?

    It did seem like there were a few of them with [mental disabilities], and when there are people like that it’s a little exploitive, but that’s partly why people watch the show before the competition gets under way to see how bad people are. But it’s not kind.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.